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Keyword: remote sensing

Region 4 Science Partner Program: Characterizing and conserving groundwater dependent ecosystems

Projects Posted on: August 14, 2018
This project is an interdisciplinary working group focused on collecting, documenting, exchanging, and archiving information about R4 groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs), particularly springs and wetlands.Current partners include Kate Dwire (RMRS), John Proctor (R4 Botanist), Mark Muir (R4 Hydrologist), Cynthia Tait (R4 Aquatic Program Manager), and Jeff Bruggink (R4 Soil Scientist).

Northwest Forest Plan—the first 10 years (1994-2003): status and trend of late-successional and old-growth forest.

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
We monitored the status and trend of late-successional and old-growth forest (older forest) on 24 million ac of land managed by the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and National Park Service in the Northwest Forest Plan (the Plan) area between 1994 and 2003. We developed baseline maps from satellite imagery of older forest conditions at the start of the Plan.

Modeling and mapping basal area of Pinus taeda L. plantation using airborne LiDAR data

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2018
Basal area (BA) is a good predictor of timber stand volume and forest growth. This study developed predictive models using field and airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data for estimation of basal area in Pinus taeda plantation in south Brazil. In the field, BA was collected from conventional forest inventory plots.

Use of ordinary kriging and Gaussian conditional simulation to interpolate airborne fire radiative energy density estimates [Corrigendum]

Publications Posted on: May 11, 2018
Fire radiative energy density (FRED, J m-2) integrated from fire radiative power density (FRPD, W m-2) observations of landscape-level fires can present an undersampling problem when collected from fixed-wing aircraft. In the present study, the aircraft made multiple passes over the fire at ~3 min intervals, thus failing to observe most of the FRPD emitted as the flame front spread.

The Cooney Ridge Fire Experiment: An early operation to relate pre-, active, and post-fire field and remotely sensed measurements

Publications Posted on: May 11, 2018
The Cooney Ridge Fire Experiment conducted by fire scientists in 2003 was a burnout operation supported by a fire suppression crew on the active Cooney Ridge wildfire incident. The fire experiment included measurements of pre-fire fuels, active fire behavior, and immediate post-fire effects.

Fine resolution probabilistic land cover classification of landscapes in the southeastern United States

Publications Posted on: May 10, 2018
Land cover classification provides valuable information for prioritizing management and conservation operations across large landscapes. Current regional scale land cover geospatial products within the United States have a spatial resolution that is too coarse to provide the necessary information for operations at the local and project scales.

Mapping forest characteristics at fine resolution across large landscapes of the southeastern United States using NAIP imagery and FIA field plot data

Publications Posted on: May 10, 2018
Accurate information is important for effective management of natural resources. In the field of forestry, field measurements of forest characteristics such as species composition, basal area, and stand density are used to inform and evaluate management activities. Quantifying these metrics accurately across large landscapes in a meaningful way is extremely important to facilitate informed decision-making.

Multidecadal trends in area burned with high severity in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area 1880-2012

Publications Posted on: December 12, 2017
Multidecadal trends in areas burned with high severity shape ecological effects of fires, but most assessments are limited to ~30 years of satellite data.

A LiDAR-based analysis of the effects of slope, vegetation density, and ground surface roughness on travel rates for wildland firefighter escape route mapping

Publications Posted on: October 17, 2017
Escape routes are essential components of wildland firefighter safety, providing pre-defined pathways to a safety zone. Among the many factors that affect travel rates along an escape route, landscape conditions such as slope, lowlying vegetation density, and ground surface roughness are particularly influential, and can be measured using airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data.

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