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Keyword: rehabilitation

Landscape and organismal factors affecting sagebrush-seedling transplant survival after megafire restoration

Publications Posted on: July 25, 2019
Larger and more frequent disturbances are motivating efforts to accelerate recovery of foundational perennial species by focusing efforts into establishing island patches to sustain keystone species and facilitate recovery of the surrounding plant community.

Comparison of postfire seeding practices for Wyoming big sagebrush

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2017
Wildfires in the Great Basin have resulted in widespread loss of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young), an ecologically important shrub that has proven difficult to establish from seed.We sought to identify optimal seeding practices forWyoming big sagebrush in the context of postfire seeding operations involving rangeland drills.

Examining the potential of forest residue-based amendments for post-wildfire rehabilitation in Colorado, USA

Publications Posted on: March 11, 2017
Wildfire is a natural disturbance, though elemental losses and changes that occur during combustion and post-fire erosion can have long-term impacts on soil properties, ecosystem productivity, and watershed condition. Here we evaluate the potential of forest residue-based materials to rehabilitate burned soils.

Effects of postfire seeding and fertilizing on hillslope erosion in north-central Washington, USA

Publications Posted on: November 07, 2016
After the 1998 North 25 Fire in the Wenatchee National Forest, eight study sites were established on steep, severely burned hillslopes to examine the effectiveness of postfire seeding and fertilizing treatments in increasing cover to reduce hillslope erosion, and to measure the nutrient content of the eroded sediment.

Postfire drill-seeding of Great Basin plants: Effects of contrasting drills on seeded and nonseeded species

Publications Posted on: September 15, 2016
Objectives of postfire seeding in the Great Basin include reestablishment of perennial cover, suppression of exotic annual weeds, and restoration of diverse plant communities. Nonconventional seeding techniques may be required when seeding mixes of grasses, forbs, and shrubs containing seeds of different sizes.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 2

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 1

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Seed and soil dynamics in shrubland ecosystems: proceedings; 2002 August 12-16; Laramie, WY

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The 38 papers in this proceedings are divided into six sections; the first includes an overview paper and documentation of the first Shrub Research Consortium Distinguished Service Award. The next four sections cluster papers on restoration and revegetation, soil and microsite requirements, germination and establishment of desired species, and community ecology of shrubland systems.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 3

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Wyoming big sagebrush

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The widespread occurrence of big sagebrush can be attributed to many adaptive features. Big sagebrush plays an essential role in its communities by providing wildlife habitat, modifying local environmental conditions, and facilitating the reestablishment of native herbs. Currently, however, many sagebrush steppe communities are highly fragmented.

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