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Keyword: recruitment

Precision gain versus effort with joint models using detection/non‐detection and banding data

Publications Posted on: May 30, 2019
Capture-recapture techniques provide valuable information, but are often more cost-prohibitive at large spatial and temporal scales than less‐intensive sampling techniques. Model development combining multiple data sources to leverage data source strengths and for improved parameter precision has increased, but with limited discussion on precision gain versus effort.

The big picture on whitebark pine

FS News Posted on: August 31, 2018
Throughout the western United States, whitebark pine is experiencing high mortality, leading to concern about long-term viability of whitebark pine and other species that depend on it. Two new studies of whitebark pine in the western U.S. show that this species continues to die-off in alarming numbers and identifies locations where forest managers may be able to encourage growth of young whitebark pines.

A landscape-level assessment of whitebark pine regeneration in the Rocky Mountains, USA

Publications Posted on: August 30, 2018
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) has recently experienced high mortality due to multiple stressors, and future population viability may rely on natural regeneration. We assessed whitebark pine seedling densities throughout the US Rocky Mountains and identified stand, site, and climatic variables related to seedling presence based on data from 1,217 USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots.

Landscape-scale assessments of whitebark pine

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 23, 2018
Forest inventory data show that more than half of all standing whitebark pine trees in the U.S. are dead. Regeneration of whitebark pine is widespread, especially in lodgepole pine stands, which suggests that active management of whitebark pine should target mixed-species stands to take advantage of natural regeneration. 

Whitebark pine distribution and regeneration

Media Gallery Posted on: June 04, 2018
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is an ecologically important species in high-altitude areas of the West due to the habitat and food source it provides for Clark’s nutcrackers, red squirrels, grizzly bears, and other animals. Whitebark pine stands have recently experienced high mortality due to wildfire, white pine blister rust, and a mountain pine beetle outbreak, leading to questions about the species’ long-term viability. This project seeks to quantify the current distribution and regeneration status of whitebark pine throughout its US range.

Whitebark pine distribution and regeneration in mixed-species stands

Projects Posted on: June 01, 2018
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is an ecologically important species in high-altitude areas of the West due to the habitat and food source it provides for Clark’s nutcrackers, red squirrels, grizzly bears, and other animals. Whitebark pine stands have recently experienced high mortality due to wildfire, white pine blister rust, and a mountain pine beetle outbreak, leading to questions about the species’ long-term viability. This project seeks to quantify the current distribution and regeneration status of whitebark pine throughout its US range.

Long-term demography of the Northern Goshawk in a variable environment

Publications Posted on: May 17, 2017
The Nearctic northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis atricapillis) is a resident of conifer, broadleaf, and mixed forests from the boreal to the southwestern montane regions of North America.

Northern goshawks on the Kaibab Plateau: A 20-year investigation into factors affecting their demography

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 26, 2016
The elusive northern goshawk, its forest habitats, and the habitats of its bird and mammal prey are significant conservation issues related to the management of forests throughout the hawk’s North American range.  The Rocky Mountain Research Station has been enumerating the population size and documenting the population ecology and demography of individual goshawks on Arizona’s Kaibab Plateau for 20 years with the objective of identifying the vegetation composition and structure of forests habitats that best supports their survival and reproduction.

Incorporating plant mortality and recruitment into rangeland management and assessment

Publications Posted on: October 07, 2015
Rangeland management is largely focused on managing vegetation change. Objectives may include managing against change if the desired vegetation is in place, or attempting to create a shift in vegetation if the desired plant community is not present. There is a rich body of research documenting influences of disturbance and management on rangeland vegetation.

Ecology of Mexican spotted owls in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 20, 2015
RMRS scientists recently completed a 10 year study of a population of threatened Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico. This study evaluated demography, habitat use, and diet composition of spotted owls, as well as forest structure characteristic of owl habitat. We determined that most owl nests are located in wet mixed-conifer forests not greatly in need of ecological restoration.

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