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Keyword: random forests

Fire Lab tree list: A tree-level model of the western US circa 2009 v1

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for many applications such as estimating terrestrial carbon resources, predicting tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory.

Mapping forest vegetation for the western United States using modified random forests imputation of FIA forest plots

Publications Posted on: October 25, 2016
Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for many applications such as estimating terrestrial carbon resources, predicting tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory.

A tree-level model of forests in the western United States

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 14, 2016
https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53114Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for a number of applications including estimating terrestrial carbon resources, tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory. However, detailed mapping of trees for large areas is not feasible with current technologies. We used a statistical method called random forests for matching forest plot data with biophysical characteristics of the landscape in order to populate entire landscapes with a limited set of forest plot inventory data. 

Map your models with ModelMap

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2016
Working in the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program, we have access to a valuable collection of detailed information about forests on thousands of sample plots distributed across the country. This information is used to produce summaries of forestland characteristics for a variety of geographic areas such as states or individual national forests. We wanted a simple tool to extend this sample data and make detailed maps of forest characteristics for all the land in between the study locations.

Utilizing random forests imputation of forest plot data for landscape-level wildfire analyses

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2015
Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the United States are desirable for a number of applications. For landscape-level fire and forest simulations that use the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS), a spatial tree-level dataset, or “tree list”, is a necessity.

Projections of contemporary and future climate niche for Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate subsp. wyomingensis): A guide for restoration

Publications Posted on: April 17, 2015
Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is one of the most widespread and abundant plant species in the intermountain regions of western North America. This species occupies an extremely wide ecological niche ranging from the semi-arid basins to the subalpine. Within this large niche, three widespread subspecies are recognized.

Discriminant analysis reveals limited association between forest habitat types and the environment in western United States land classification

Publications Posted on: September 11, 2014
Critical assessment of the connection between units of the habitat type system and physiographic, climatic and soil factors in interior western United States land classifications.

Evaluating effectiveness of down-sampling for stratified designs and unbalanced prevalence in Random Forest models of tree species distributions in Nevada

Publications Posted on: October 29, 2012
Random Forests is frequently used to model species distributions over large geographic areas. Complications arise when data used to train the models have been collected in stratified designs that involve different sampling intensity per stratum. The modeling process is further complicated if some of the target species are relatively rare on the landscape leading to an unbalanced number of presences and absences in the training data.

Both topography and climate affected forest and woodland burn severity in two regions of the western US, 1984 to 2006

Publications Posted on: December 28, 2011
Fire is a keystone process in many ecosystems of western North America. Severe fires kill and consume large amounts of above- and belowground biomass and affect soils, resulting in long-lasting consequences for vegetation, aquatic ecosystem productivity and diversity, and other ecosystem properties.

Consistency of forest presence and biomass predictions modeled across overlapping spatial and temporal extents

Publications Posted on: September 20, 2011
We assessed the consistency across space and time of spatially explicit models of forest presence and biomass in southern Missouri, USA, for adjacent, partially overlapping satellite image Path/Rows, and for coincident satellite images from the same Path/Row acquired in different years.

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