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Keyword: precipitation

Predicting vegetation phenology in response to climate change using bioclimatic indices in Iraq

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Although most phenology models can predict vegetation response to climatic variations, these models often perform poorly in precipitation-limited regions. In this study, we modified a phenology model, called the Growing Season Index (GSI), to better quantify relationships between weather and vegetation canopy dynamics across various semi-arid regions of Iraq.

Decreasing number of rainy days in summer has increased western wildfire

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 06, 2018
The number and size of large wildfires have increased dramatically in the western United States during the past three decades. Prior understanding was that the increase in fires was mainly attributable to warming temperatures and earlier snowmelt. In this study, a research team contrasted the three main hypothesized climatic drivers of recent increases in western US wildfire activity: decreased snowpack, increased temperature, and decreased precipitation.

Decreasing Number of Rainy Days in Summer Has Increased Western Wildfire

FS News Posted on: August 20, 2018
The number and size of large wildfires have increased dramatically in the western United States during the past three decades. Contrary to previous understanding, new research shows that significant declines in summer precipitation and lengthening dry spells during summer are major drivers of the increase in fire activity. Prior understanding was that the increase in fires was attributable mainly to warming temperatures and earlier snowmelt.

Weather conditions and date influence male Sage Grouse attendance rates at leks

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
For lek-breeding birds, lek attendance can be correlated with mating success. Variability in lek attendance could confound interpretation of male reproductive effort and complicate the use of lek counts as an index to monitor abundance. We assessed the daily probability of male Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianus lek attendance and explored implications of attendance on lek counts.

Data Descriptor: TerraClimate, a high-resolution global dataset of monthly climate and climatic water balance from 1958-2015

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2018
We present TerraClimate, a dataset of high-spatial resolution (1/24°, ~4-km) monthly climate and climatic water balance for global terrestrial surfaces from 1958–2015.

RPA Historical observational data (1979-2015) for the conterminous United States at the 1/24 degree grid scale based on MACA training data (METDATA)

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains a gridded historical (1979-2015) dataset for the conterminous United States that has been summarized to the monthly time scale. This monthly historical dataset was developed using the daily MACA observational data (METDATA), also called MACA Training Data (https://www.northwestknowledge.net/metdata/data/).

Coram Experimental Forest daily meteorology data for Desert Ridge and Terrace Hills weather stations: 1996-2015

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains daily meteorological data collected at the Desert Ridge and Terrace Hills weather stations located on the Coram Experimental Forest (Flathead National Forest) in Montana. The Terrace Hills weather station was installed in May of 1996, and the Desert Ridge weather station was installed in May of 2001. Data are included up through 2015 for both stations.

Long-term demography of the Northern Goshawk in a variable environment

Publications Posted on: May 17, 2017
The Nearctic northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis atricapillis) is a resident of conifer, broadleaf, and mixed forests from the boreal to the southwestern montane regions of North America.

The tortoise and the hare: Can the slow native plant win?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 03, 2017
It has been suggested that exotic plants will be more successful than native plant species as a result of climate change. This is because exotics often exhibit stronger responses to disturbance, faster growth rates, and greater plasticity. In this study, we show that climate change can actually shift the balance in favor of natives when it creates conditions that favor the slower more "tortoise-like" strategies of some natives.

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