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Keyword: ponderosa pine forests

Silvicultural activities in Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, Central Oregon

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Pringle Falls Experimental Forest has been a center for research in ponderosa pine forests east of the crest of the Cascade Range since 1931. Long-term research facilities, sites, and future research opportunities are currently at risk from stand-replacement wildfire because of changes in stand structure resulting from past fire exclusion.

Implementing the expanded prescribed fire program on the Gila National Forest, New Mexico: implications for snag management

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Efforts to return natural fire to the Gila National Forest, New Mexico, have resulted in controversy regarding management of snags (standing dead trees). The importance of snags for wildlife, especially cavity-dependent birds, is well documented.

GSD update: A review of recent research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 14, 2015
This issue of the GSD Update takes a look at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted related to 1) ecosystem resiliency, and native and invasive species management, and 2) the role of climate in species adaptation, restoration and management.

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2014 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: April 15, 2015
In this issue of the GSD Update, we take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted.

Habitat suitability and nest survival of white-headed woodpeckers in unburned forests of Oregon

Publications Posted on: August 31, 2011
We evaluated habitat suitability and nest survival of breeding white-headed woodpeckers (Picoides albolarvatus) in unburned forests of central Oregon, USA. Daily nest-survival rate was positively related to maximum daily temperature during the nest interval and to density of large-diameter trees surrounding the nest tree.

Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management.

The essence of fire regime-condition class assessment

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
The interagency-Fire Regime / Condition Class - assessment process (FRCC) represents a contemporary and effective means of estimating the relative degree of difference or "departure" a subject landscape condition is currently in, as compared to the historic or reference ecological conditions. This process generally applied to fire adapted systems is science-based and adaptive as are the very ecosystems that are being studied.

Assessment of drought related mortality in pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine forests using Forest Inventory and Analysis data

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) Widespread mortality in several forest types is associated with several years of drought in the Southwest. Implementation of USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) annual inventory in several states coincided with the onset of elevated mortality rates.

Stand level impacts of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles in pine forest types of northern Arizona

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an extended abstract only) Extensive tree mortality occurred in ponderosa pine forests and pinon-juniper woodlands of Arizona from 2001-2004. This mortality has been attributed to a combination of an extensive drought, overstocked stands of pine, and increased bark beetle populations. A complex of Ips and Dendroctonus species worked in concert to kill ponderosa pine.

The irrationality of continued fire suppression: A partial analysis of the costs and benefits of restoration-based fuel reduction treatments vs. no treatment

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) In 1905, the Bureau of Forestry became the U.S. Forest Service and was given responsibility for protecting newly designated forest reserves. A critical part of its charge was the prevention and control of fires. In 1908 Congress set up a unique system, like an open checkbook, that assured payment for fire suppression as needed.

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