You are here

Keyword: plant materials

Assessment of range planting as a conservation practice

Publications Posted on: September 28, 2016
Natural Resource Conservation Service Range Planting - Conservation Practice Standards provide guidelines for making decisions about seedbed preparation, planting methods, plant materials selection, seeding rate, seeding depth, timing of seeding, postplanting management, and weed control. Adoption of these standards is expected to contribute to successful improvement of vegetation composition and productivity of grazed plant communities.

Great Basin Native Plant Project: 2015 Progress Report

Publications Posted on: June 21, 2016
The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and United States Department of Interior (USDI) Report to Congress encouraged use of native plant materials for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 2

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 1

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Restoring Western Ranges and Wildlands, vol. 3

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This work, in three volumes, provides background on philosophy, processes, plant materials selection, site preparation, and seed and seeding equipment for revegetating disturbed rangelands, emphasizing use of native species.

Increasing Native Forb Seed Supplies for the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Over the last 150 years, excessive grazing, annual weed invasions, increased wildfire frequency, and other human disturbances have negatively impacted native plant communities of the Great Basin. Native plant materials and appropriate planting strategies are needed to recreate diverse communities in areas requiring active restoration. Although native forbs are critical components of most plant communities, available seed supplies remain low.

Vegetation of chained and non-chained seedings after wildfire in Utah

Publications Posted on: March 26, 2015
After wildfires in 1996 in the sagebrush(Artemisias pp.) and pinyon-juniper (Pinus spp.-Juniperus spp.) zones of west-central Utah, the USDI-BLM attempted to reduce soil erosion and cheatgrass proliferation (Bromus tectorum L.) through rehabilitation treatments. We compared the vegetation of aerially seeded, chained treatments with aerially seeded but non-chained treatments for 3 years following seeding.

Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project: 2012 progress report

Publications Posted on: June 21, 2013
The Interagency Native Plant Materials Development Program outlined in the 2002 USDA and USDI Report to Congress, USDI Bureau of Land Management programs and policies, and the Great Basin Restoration Initiative encourage the use of native species for rangeland rehabilitation and restoration where feasible.

Managing Intermountain rangelands - improvement of range and wildlife habitats: proceedings; 1981 September 15-17; Twin Falls, ID; 1982 June 22-24; Elko, NV

Publications Posted on: February 20, 2013
The proceedings summarizes recent research and existing literature pertaining to the restoration and management of game and livestock ranges in the Intermountain Region. Improved plant materials and planting practices are emphasized. The series of 28 papers was presented at the Restoration of Range and Wildlife Habitat Training Sessions held in Twin Falls, Idaho, September 15-17, 1981 and in Elko, Nevada, June 22-24, 1982.

A restoration practitioner's guide to the restoration gene pool concept

Publications Posted on: November 18, 2009
Choosing plant materials for each desired species is often one of the most difficult steps in developing a restoration plan. The Restoration Gene Pool concept was developed to clarify the options available to the ecological restoration practitioner in terms of plant materials. We present a decision-making flowchart incorporating the issues delineated in the Restoration Gene Pool concept.

Pages