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Keyword: Pinus ponderosa

Mountain pine beetle attack in ponderosa pine: Comparing methods for rating susceptibility

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Two empirical methods for rating susceptibility of mountain pine beetle attack in ponderosa pine were evaluated. The methods were compared to stand data modeled to objectively rate each sampled stand for susceptibly to bark-beetle attack.

Genetic variation in ponderosa pine: A 15-year test of provenances in the Great Plains

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Survival was highest and height growth greatest in ponderosa pine provenances from northcentral Nebraska, southwest South Dakota, and the High Plains region. Genotype x environment interaction was minimal in central and northern Great Plains plantations. Age/age correlations indicate provenances expressing superior height growth can be identified after 5 or 10 years.

Ten-year performance of ponderosa pine provenances in the Great Plains of North America

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
A cluster and discriminant analysis based on nine of the best plantations, partitioned the seed provenance populations into six geographic clusters according to their consistency of performance in the plantations.

Modeling forest scenic beauty: Concepts and application to ponderosa pine

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Statistical models are presented which relate near-view scenic beauty of ponderosa pine stands in the Southwest to variables describing physical characteristics. The models suggest that herbage and large ponderosa pine contribute to scenic beauty, while numbers of small and intermediate-sized pine trees and downed wood, especially as slash, detract from scenic beauty. Areas of lower overstory density and less tree clumping were preferred.

Identifying ponderosa pines infested with mountain pine beetles

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Trees successfully and unsuccessfully attacked by mountain pine beetles have several symptoms in common, so that proper diagnosis is not always easy. Guidelines presented here enable the observer to correctly distinguish nearly all attacked trees.

Silvicultural activities in Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, Central Oregon

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Pringle Falls Experimental Forest has been a center for research in ponderosa pine forests east of the crest of the Cascade Range since 1931. Long-term research facilities, sites, and future research opportunities are currently at risk from stand-replacement wildfire because of changes in stand structure resulting from past fire exclusion.

Songbird status and roles

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This chapter reviews studies on songbird ecology conducted in Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado; studies from outside this region are mentioned when they bear direct relevance to our primary region. The studies were conducted in sites where ponderosa pine occurred at least in equal coverage with other trees.

Songbird ecology in southwestern ponderosa pine forests: a literature review

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This publication reviews and synthesizes the literature about ponderosa pine forests of the Southwest, with emphasis on the biology, ecology, and conservation of songbirds. Critical bird-habitat management issues related to succession, snags, old growth, fire, logging, grazing, recreation, and landscape scale are addressed. Overviews of the ecology, current use, and history of Southwestern ponderosa pine forests are also provided.

Ecology of southwestern ponderosa pine forests

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Ponderosa pine forests are important because of their wide distribution, commercial value, and because they provide habitat for many plants and animals. Ponderosa pine forests are noted for their variety of passerine birds resulting from variation in forest composition and structure modified by past and present human use.

Landscape dynamics and considerations

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Many studies in Southwestern ponderosa pine forests have investigated the relationships between songbirds and habitat characteristics at the level of individual patches (Hall et al. and Finch et al., this volume). To date, though, no published studies from Southwestern ponderosa pine forests have examined the relationships between songbirds and spatial patterns at the level of entire landscapes.

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