You are here

Keyword: Pinus monticola

Deception Creek Experimental Forest

Publications Posted on: May 11, 2018
Deception Creek Experimental Forest is in one of the most productive forests in the Rocky Mountains. When the forest was established in 1933, large, old-age western white pine (Pinus monticola) were important for producing lumber products. The forest, located in the Coeur d'Alene Mountains, is in the heart of the western white pine forest type.

Restoring dry and moist forests of the inland northwestern United States [Chapter 23]

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
The complex topography of the Inland Northwestern United States (58.4 million ha) interacts with soils and a highly variable climate to provide a mosaic of dry and moist mixed conifer forest settings.

Western white pine development in relation to biophysical characteristics across different spatial scales in the Coeur d'Alene River basin in northern Idaho, U.S.A

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2018
Many studies have assessed tree development beneath canopies in forest ecosystems, but results are seldom placed within the context of broad-scale biophysical factors. Mapped landscape characteristics for three watersheds, located within the Coeur d’Alene River basin in northern Idaho, were integrated to create a spatial hierarchy reflecting biophysical factors that influence western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D.

Biophysical characteristics influencing growth and abundance of western white pine (Pinus monticola) across spatial scales in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2018
During the past 50 years the moist forests of northern Idaho changed from being dominated by western white pine (Pinus monticola), an early sera! species, to ones dominated by late serial species, grand fir (Abies grandis) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla). Variable fire regimes, successional processes and endemic insects and pathogens worked in concert to produce the stable and resilient forests of the past.

Exponential fertilization of Pinus monticola seedlings: nutrient uptake efficiency, leaching fractions, and early outplanting performance

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We evaluated nutrient uptake efficiency and subsequent leaching fractions for western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings grown with exponentially increasing or conventional (constant) fertilization in a greenhouse.

Silvics of western white pine

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
Western white pine grows along west coast mountain ranges from Vancouver Island and the Homathko River on the adjacent mainland in British Columbia southward to the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California (13, 65, 75, 83).

Juvenile performance of hybrids between western and eastern white pine

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
The growth and performance of Pinus monticola, P. strobus, and their hybrids were investigated at several sites in northern Idaho and western Montana. At three sites in northern Idaho, two hybrid progenies were approximately twice as tall and markedly excelled corresponding P. monticola progenies (having the same female parents) in height growth at age 8 years . At one site in western Montana none of the few P. monticola, P.

Second-growth western white pine stands

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
The western white pine type is the most valuable timber cover type of the Inland Empire.

Cleaning to favor western white pine - its effects upon composition, growth, and potential values

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
The management of western white pine (Pinus monticola) requires the production of a high proportion of valuable white pine crop trees in order to defray the costs of protection from blister rust. Current average selling prices of lumber give white pine about $50 per m.b.f. advantage over western larch (Larix occidentalis) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), the next most valuable species common to the type.

Pole blight of western white pine

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
Pole blight is one of the most serious diseases of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) and is restricted to that species. The disease is given this name because it affects pole-size trees primarily, usually those within the 40- to 100-year age class, although trees both younger and older are occasionally affected.

Pages