You are here

Keyword: Pinus longaeva

Mountain pine beetle in high-elevation five-needle white pine ecosystems

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Across western North America mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), populations are growing at exponential rates in pine ecosystems that span a wide range of elevations. As temperature increased over the past several decades, the flexible, thermally-regulated life-history strategies of mountain pine beetle have allowed for increased population success in numerous habitats.

Clark's nutcracker demography and habitat use in Bridger-Teton National Forest-preliminary analyses

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
The population status of and habitat use by Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) has rarely been studied and remains poorly understood, in part due to the previous lack of a reliable method of surveying nutcracker populations. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Clark's nutcrackers have recently declined precipitously throughout large parts of their range.

Pre-dispersal seed predator dynamics at the northern limits of limber pine distribution

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) is listed provincially as endangered in the northern part of its geographic range (Alberta) due to the high mortality caused by white pine blister rust (WPBR) (Cronartium ribicola) and mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and limited regeneration opportunities due to fire exclusion.

Sugar pine seed harvest by Clark's nutcracker: Annual use of a transient resource in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) are well known for using conifer seeds as their principal nutriment source. Seeds are primarily harvested from whitebark (Pinus albicaulis), piñon (P. edulis), limber (P. flexilis), southwestern white (P. strobiformis), Jeffrey (P. jeffreyi), and ponderosa (P. ponderosa) pine as well as Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) (Tomback 1998).

Seed dispersal in limber and southwestern white pine: Comparing core and peripheral populations

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
According to the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution (Thompson 2005), the potential for coevolutionary relationships between interacting species varies with the presence of other species within a community. This implies that the strength of coevolution between two species may vary geographically.

Regeneration and survival of whitebark pine after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Successional whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) communities are dependent on fire and other disturbances for renewal (Arno 2001). Where whitebark pine regenerates results from cache site selection by Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) in relation to the environmental tolerances of seeds and seedlings (Tomback 2001).

Limber pine health in the Canadian Rockies

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) reaches the northern limit of its range at about 52 degrees latitude in Alberta (AB) and 51 degrees latitude in British Columbia (BC). Most populations are found on the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains, with a few disjunct populations west of the Continental Divide in southeastern BC.

Determining Clark's nutcracker use of whitebark pine communities in regard to stand health in Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), one of five stone pines worldwide, is found at treeline and subalpine elevations in the mountains of western North America (McCaughey and Schmidt 2001). Considered a keystone species, it helps maintain subalpine biodiversity, protects watersheds and promotes post-fire regeneration (Tomback and others 2001).

Altered species interactions and implications for natural regeneration in whitebark pine communities

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) decline has altered trophic interactions and led to changes in community dynamics in many Rocky Mountain subalpine forests (McKinney and Tomback 2007). Here we discuss how altered species interactions, driven by disproportionate whitebark pine mortality, constrain the capability of whitebark pine forests to contribute genetic material to subsequent generations.

Long-term monitoring of high-elevation white pine communities in Pacific West Region National Parks

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) networks conduct long-term monitoring to provide park managers information on the status and trends in key biological and environmental attributes (Vital Signs).

Pages