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Keyword: Pinus longaeva

Whitebark and limber pine restoration and monitoring in Glacier National Park

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) are keystone species important to watersheds, grizzly and black bears, squirrels, birds, and other wildlife. Both high elevation five-needled pines have dramatically declined in Glacier National Park primarily due to white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) and fire exclusion, with mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) as a potential threat.

The proactive strategy for sustaining five-needle pine populations: An example of its implementation in the southern Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
The imminent invasion of the non-native fungus, Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch., that causes white pine blister rust (WPBR) and the current mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, MPB) epidemic in northern Colorado limber pine forests will severely affect the forest regeneration cycle necessary for functioning ecosystems.

Inoculation and successful colonization of whitebark pine seedlings with native mycorrhizal fungi under greenhouse conditions

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Efforts to maintain and restore whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests in western North America have increased dramatically over the last two decades and now include the planting of nursery-grown rust resistant seedlings in openings and burned areas. Over 200,000 nursery seedlings have been planted in the western U.S. but survival rates are low and in many areas approach zero.

Exploring whitebark pine resilience in the crown of the continent

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) populations are declining across western North America due to synergies of disturbances, both natural and anthropogenic. Losses at treeline may result in significant changes to the upper subalpine zone, which may result in a regime shift, thus affecting the ecological goods and services whitebark pine systems provide for other species, including humans.

Investigating the optimality of proactive management of an invasive forest pest

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
This paper offers a preliminary investigation into the conditions under which it might be optimal to engage in proactive management of a non-timber forest resource in the presence of an invasive species whose spread is unaffected by management action. Proactive management is defined as treating an uninfected area to encourage healthy ecosystem function, given that the arrival of the invasive is inevitable.

Strategies, tools, and challenges for sustaining and restoring high elevation five-needle white pine forests in western North America

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Many ecologically important, five-needle white pine forests that historically dominated the high elevation landscapes of western North America are now being heavily impacted by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus spp.) outbreaks, the exotic disease white pine blister rust (WPBR), and altered high elevation fire regimes. Management intervention using specially designed strategic treatments will be needed to conserve these keystone species.

Rust resistance in seedling families of Pinus albicaulis and Pinus strobiformis and implications for restoration

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Infection and mortality levels from Cronartium ribicola, the fungus causing white pine blister rust, are very high in parts of the geographic range of Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine) and P. strobiformis (Southwestern white pine). Genetic resistance to this non-native fungus will be one of the key factors in maintaining or restoring populations of these species in areas of high blister rust incidence.

Molecular dissection of white pine genetic resistance to Cronartium ribicola

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
Pinus monticola (Dougl. ex D. Don.) maintains a complex defence system that detects white pine blister rust pathogen (Cronartium ribicola J.C.Fisch.) and activates resistance responses. A thorough understanding of how it functions at the molecular level would provide us new strategies for creating forest trees with durable disease resistance. Our research focuses on molecular dissection of P.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) applications in white pine blister rust resistance screening

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
A goal of breeding programs for resistance to white pine blister rust is the development of multigenic resistance, even if the genetics and mechanisms of resistance may be imperfectly understood. The goal of multigenic resistance has prompted efforts to categorize host resistance reactions at increasingly finer scales, to identify heritable traits that may confer quantitative resistance.

Status of white pine blister rust and seed collections in california's high-elevation white pine species

Publications Posted on: July 05, 2011
White pine blister rust (caused by the non-native pathogen Cronartium ribicola) reached northern California about 80 years ago. Over the years its spread southward had been primarily recorded on sugar pine. However, observations on its occurrence had also been reported in several of the higher elevation five-needled white pine species in California.

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