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Keyword: Pinus aristata

Back from the brink: Framework to sustain resilience to species at risk

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 14, 2019
The Regeneration for Resilience (R4R) framework provides a decision structure to prioritize limited resources and utilize seedling planting and natural regeneration management to offer the best likelihood of success in positioning stands and landscapes to support resilience self-sustaining tree populations that are threatened by invasive pests. Effective management of forest regeneration dynamics can increase forest resilience and adaptive capacity to mitigate impacts of invasive species.

Regeneration for resilience framework to support regeneration decisions for species with populations at risk of extirpation by white pine blister rust

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Natural forests are increasingly invaded by nonnative pests and pathogens that threaten host species with population extirpation and cascading ecological impacts.

The future of subalpine forests in the Southern Rocky Mountains: Trajectories for Pinus aristata genetic lineages

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2018
Like many other high elevation alpine tree species, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata Engelm.) may be particularly vulnerable to climate change. To evaluate its potential vulnerability to shifts in climate, we defined the suitable climate space for each of four genetic lineages of bristlecone pine and for other subalpine tree species in close proximity to bristlecone pine forests.

Conservation of bristlecone pine – proactive management today and resources for tomorrow

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 23, 2017
Rocky Mountain bristlecone pines are long-lived, exhibit delayed maturation, have low genetic diversity, and inhabit cold, high-elevation environments. They are threatened by the non-native disease white pine blister rust, warming temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, and altered disturbance regimes. Sustaining bristlecone pine populations is essential to (1) maintain healthy mountain-top ecosystems and (2) ensure that the young bristlecone pine trees of today and tomorrow have the opportunity to achieve great age with picturesque gnarled trunks and wind-swept canopies for future generations to experience and enjoy.  

Resistance to white pine blister rust in Pinus flexilis and P

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2016
The non-native fungus Cronartium ribicola, that causes white pine blister rust (WPBR), is impacting or threatening limber pine, Pinus flexilis, and Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata. In the Southern Rockies, where the rust invasion is still expanding, we have the opportunity to be proactive and prepare the landscape for invasion.

Partial cambial mortality in high-elevation Pinus aristata (Pinaceae)

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2016
Partial cambial mortality is a growth form that is characteristic of Pinus aristata trees. To better elucidate their cambial death pattern, tree size and aspect of cambial death data were gathered from three Pinus aristata forests in central Colorado, USA. Stripping frequency tended to be higher for larger diameter classes. Partial cambial mortality exhibits significant directionality within each stand.

IUFRO joint conference of five-needle pine, rusts of forest trees, and genomics groups

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 19, 2015
World–wide experts in genetics and genomics of five-needle pines and rusts of forest trees convened in Fort Collins, Colorado, for their first joint conference to share cutting edge methods and emerging technologies to sustain healthy forest ecosystems.   

Using among-year variation to assess maternal effects in Pinus aristata and Pinus flexilis

Publications Posted on: July 08, 2015
Maternal effects, the effect of the maternal environment during development on offspring growth, can complicate the interpretation of common garden studies. Growing one or more generations in a common environment can help minimize maternal effects, but is often not practical with long-lived species. In Pinus aristata Engelm.

Establishing the science foundation to sustain high-elevation five-needle pine forests threatened by novel interacting stresses in four western National Parks [Proceedings]

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2014
High-elevation five-needle white pines are among the most picturesque trees in many national parks, as well as other federal, state, and private lands in western North America. These trees often live to great ages; the trees' gnarled trunks give testimony to fierce winds that buffet them on exposed rocky sites.

Establishing the science foundation to sustain high-elevation five-needle pine forests threatened by novel interacting stresses in four western National Parks

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2014
High-elevation, five-needle white pines are among the most picturesque trees in many national parks as well as other federal, state, and private lands in western North America. These trees often live to a great age; the trees' gnarled trunks give testimony to fierce winds that buffet them on exposed rocky sites.

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