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Keyword: pinon-juniper and juniper woodlands

Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management.

The essence of fire regime-condition class assessment

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
The interagency-Fire Regime / Condition Class - assessment process (FRCC) represents a contemporary and effective means of estimating the relative degree of difference or "departure" a subject landscape condition is currently in, as compared to the historic or reference ecological conditions. This process generally applied to fire adapted systems is science-based and adaptive as are the very ecosystems that are being studied.

Assessment of drought related mortality in pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine forests using Forest Inventory and Analysis data

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) Widespread mortality in several forest types is associated with several years of drought in the Southwest. Implementation of USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) annual inventory in several states coincided with the onset of elevated mortality rates.

Stand level impacts of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles in pine forest types of northern Arizona

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an extended abstract only) Extensive tree mortality occurred in ponderosa pine forests and pinon-juniper woodlands of Arizona from 2001-2004. This mortality has been attributed to a combination of an extensive drought, overstocked stands of pine, and increased bark beetle populations. A complex of Ips and Dendroctonus species worked in concert to kill ponderosa pine.

The irrationality of continued fire suppression: A partial analysis of the costs and benefits of restoration-based fuel reduction treatments vs. no treatment

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) In 1905, the Bureau of Forestry became the U.S. Forest Service and was given responsibility for protecting newly designated forest reserves. A critical part of its charge was the prevention and control of fires. In 1908 Congress set up a unique system, like an open checkbook, that assured payment for fire suppression as needed.

Home range and habitat selection patterns of mule deer in a restoration-treated ponderosa pine forest

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) Forest restoration treatments are currently being conducted throughout the state of Arizona. Restoration treatments open the existing forest structure and may improve foraging habitat for mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) but may reduce the suitability of day bed sites or decrease fawn recruitment due to removal of sufficient hiding cover.

Restoration of southwestern ponderosa pine forests: Implications and opportunities for wildlife

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) After a century of fire suppression, livestock grazing, and even-aged timber harvest practices, forest managers in the Southwest face an enormous challenge. Millions of acres of ponderosa pine forest are extremely susceptible to uncharacteristic, high intensity wildfires, the consequences of which were amply demonstrated by recent mega-fires in Arizona and New Mexico.

Changes in canopy fuels and fire behavior after ponderosa pine restoration treatments: A landscape perspective

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) We modeled crown fire behavior and assessed changes in canopy fuels before and after the implementation of restoration treatments in a ponderosa pine landscape at Mt. Trumbull, Arizona. We measured 117 permanent plots before (1996/1997) and after (2003) thinning and burning treatments.

Cheatgrass encroachment on a ponderosa pine ecological restoration project in northern Arizona, U. S. A.

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
(Please note, this is an abstract only) Land managers frequently thin small-diameter trees and apply prescribed fire to reduce fuel loads and restore ecosystem structure, function, and process in forested areas. There is increasing concern that disturbances associated with these management practices can facilitate nonnative plant invasions. Bromus tectorum is an annual grass from the Mediterranean region.

Restoration of the ponderosa pine ecosystem and its understory

Publications Posted on: October 31, 2008
Restoration of the Mt. Logan ponderosa pine ecosystem has been on-going since 1995. This effort included tree thinning to a density based on what the tree density was in 1870. The desired plant community objectives from the Mt. Trumbull Resource Conservation Area Plan had a forest objective as 50% trees to be in old-growth - i.e., a diameter class of 20-31.9+ inch diameter at breast height (dbh).

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