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Keyword: Picoides arcticus

Black‐backed woodpecker abundance in the Black Hills

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
The Black Hills population of black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) was petitioned, but deemed not warranted, to be listed as a threatened or endangered species under the Endangered Species Act and more information on their population size in the region is needed. Our objective was to map abundance and provide a population estimate of black-backed woodpeckers in the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA.

Abundance of Black-backed woodpeckers and other birds in relation to disturbance and forest structure in the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming

Publications Posted on: June 22, 2017
Natural disturbances, such as wildfire and mountain pine beetle (Dentroctonus ponderosae, hereafter MPB) infestations, are two sources of large-scale disturbance that can significantly alter forest structure in the Black Hills.

Transferability of habitat suitability models for nesting woodpeckers associated with wildfire

Publications Posted on: October 25, 2016
Following wildfire, forest managers are challenged with meeting both socioeconomic demands (e.g., salvage logging) and mandates requiring habitat conservation for disturbance-associated wildlife (e.g., woodpeckers).

Woodpecker forage availability in habitat disturbances of the Black Hills

Publications Posted on: February 09, 2016
Habitat disturbance events are critical to ecological systems in which some bird species have become specialized. The vegetation community, reduced competition, ability to avoid predators, nest site characteristics, and forage opportunities within a disturbed ecosystem are all aspects that make it desirable for selection by particular species (Svardson 1949, Cody 1981, Martin 1998).

Species and habitats at risk

Projects Posted on: October 14, 2015
Land managers require high-quality information on species and habitats at risk to develop effective management strategies. In the absence of information on these species and their habitats, agencies frequently err on the side of the species and make conservative, and often unnecessary, decisions relative to habitat protection. Over 20 years of research by scientists with the Rocky Mountain Research Station are helping address these information needs.

Data product containing nest success and factors affecting nest survival for "Nest success of Black-backed Woodpeckers in forests with mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the Black Hills, South Dakota"

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
This data publication contains nest success and measurements of other factors that might affect nest survival of Black-backed Woodpeckers (picoides articus) found in the Black Hills of South Dakota in mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) infested areas in 2004 and 2005.

Capture history and handling times for "Netguns: a technique for capturing Black-backed Woodpeckers"

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
This data publication includes capture history and handling times for Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides articus) between September 2008 and June 2011 in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Study sites chosen were forests impacted recently by fire or mountian pine beetle infestations. Seventy-five Black-backed Woodpeckers were captured using Coda or carbon dioxide powered netguns, and 26 of those birds were recaptured.

Density and abundance of black-backed woodpeckers in a Ponderosa pine ecosystem

Publications Posted on: March 17, 2015
Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are usually associated with forest disturbance resulting in recently killed trees. While black-backed woodpeckers are attracted to areas affected by these disturbances, in the Black Hills they exist during interim disturbance periods in largely undisturbed forests.

The role of wildfire, prescribed fire, and mountain pine beetle infestations on the population dynamics of black-backed woodpeckers in the Black Hills, South Dakota

Publications Posted on: October 01, 2014
Wildfire and mountain pine beetle infestations are naturally occurring disturbances in western North American forests. Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are emblematic of the role these disturbances play in creating wildlife habitat, since they are strongly associated with recently-killed forests. However, management practices aimed at reducing the economic impact of natural disturbances can result in habitat loss for this species.

Ensemble modeling to predict habitat suitability for a large-scale disturbance specialist

Publications Posted on: October 23, 2013
To conserve habitat for disturbance specialist species, ecologists must identify where individuals will likely settle in newly disturbed areas. Habitat suitability models can predict which sites at new disturbances will most likely attract specialists. Without validation data from newly disturbed areas, however, the best approach for maximizing predictive accuracy can be unclear (Northwestern U.S.A.).

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