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Keyword: phenology

Will climate warming be good or bad for mountain pine beetles?

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
Insects are expected to be favored by climate change as warm winters increase survival and warm summers speed up development. Many species, however, have adapted to seasonal aspects of their environment and warming that occurs too fast may disrupt their way of life. A research-based temperature-driven model suggests that within the next few decades mountain pine beetle range retraction may occur in the United States as its lifecycle is disrupted by excessive warming. 

Using expressed behaviour of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to evaluate the vulnerability of upriver migrants under future hydrological regimes: Management implications and conservation planning

Publications Posted on: July 29, 2019
1. Globally, river systems have been extensively modified through alterations in riverscapes and flow regimes, reducing their capacity to absorb geophysical and environmental changes.

Modeling mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) oviposition

Publications Posted on: July 08, 2019
Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a significant forest disturbance agent with a widespread distribution in western North America. Population success is influenced by temperatures that drive phenology and ultimately the adult emergence synchrony required to mass attack and kill host trees during outbreaks.

Ips typographus and Dendroctonus ponderosae models project thermal suitability for intra- and inter-continental establishment in a changing climate

Publications Posted on: July 08, 2019
Climate change is altering legacies of native insect-caused disturbances and contributing to non-native invasions globally. Many insect fitness traits are temperature dependent and projected climatic changes are expected to cause continued alterations in insect-caused tree mortality, with uncertain consequences for forest ecosystems and their management.

Phenotypic selection on growth rhythm in whitebark pine under climatic conditions warmer than seed origins

Publications Posted on: May 22, 2019
Growth rhythm that is well synchronized with seasonal changes in local climatic conditions is understood to enhance fitness; however, rapid ongoing climate change threatens to disrupt this synchrony.

Proceedings-research and management of bitterbrush and cliffrose in Western North America

Publications Posted on: February 26, 2019
Bitterbrush and cliff rose are perhaps the most widely managed shrubs in Western North America. This proceedings of 27 papers is a collection of our current knowledge on research and management of bitterbrush, cliffrose, and other rosaceous shrubs in Western North America.

Linking phenological indices from digital cameras in Idaho and Montana to MODIS NDVI

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
Digital cameras can provide a consistent view of vegetation phenology at fine spatial and temporal scales that are impractical to collect manually and are currently unobtainable by satellite and most aerial based sensors.

Temporal dynamics of aerodynamic canopy height derived from eddy covariance momentum flux data across North American flux networks

Publications Posted on: September 28, 2018
Aerodynamic canopy height (ha) is the effective height of vegetation canopy for its influence on atmospheric fluxes and is a key parameter of surface-atmosphere coupling. However, methods to estimate ha from data are limited. This synthesis evaluates the applicability and robustness of the calculation of ha from eddy covariance momentum-flux data.

Evidence for a prepupal diapause in the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

Publications Posted on: June 01, 2018
Dormancy strategies, including diapause and quiescence, enable insects to evade adverse conditions and ensure seasonally appropriate life stages. A mechanistic understanding of a species’ dormancy is necessary to predict population response in a changing climate.

Linking hydroclimate to fish phenology and habitat use with ichthyographs

Publications Posted on: April 26, 2017
Streamflow and water temperature (hydroclimate) influence the life histories of aquatic biota. The relationship between streamflow and temperature varies with climate, hydrogeomorphic setting, and season. Life histories of native fishes reflect, in part, their adaptation to regional hydroclimate (flow and water temperature), local habitats, and natural disturbance regimes, all of which may be affected by water management.

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