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Keyword: Pacific Decadal Oscillation

Historic fire regime forensics: Deciphering drivers and variability from tree rings

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 18, 2016
Proper management of naturally forested landscapes requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns in which key disturbance processes are manifest and their effects on species composition and structure. Linked fire and forest histories constructed from tree-ring evidence provide valuable information about drivers of fire occurrence and about the variability and interactions of fire regimes and vegetation on heterogeneous landscapes.

Climate and human influences on historical fire regimes (AD 1400-1900) in the eastern Great Basin (USA)

Publications Posted on: January 12, 2016
High fire activity in western North America is associated with drought. Drought and fire prevail under negative El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) phases in the Southwest and with positive phases in the Northwest. Here, I infer climate effects on historic fire patterns in the geographically intermediate, eastern Great Basin and seek out evidence of human influence on reconstructed fire regimes.

Multi-season climate synchronized historical fires in dry forests (1650-1900), Northern Rockies, USA

Publications Posted on: April 14, 2008
Our objective was to infer the climate drivers of regionally synchronous fire years in dry forests of the U.S. northern Rockies in Idaho and western Montana. During our analysis period (1650-1900), we reconstructed fires from 9245 fire scars on 576 trees (mostly ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa P. & C.

Climate drivers of regionally synchronous fires in the inland northwest (1651-1900)

Publications Posted on: March 14, 2008
We inferred climate drivers of regionally synchronous surface fires from 1651 to 1900 at 15 sites with existing annually accurate fire-scar chronologies from forests dominated by ponderosa pine or Douglas-fir in the inland Northwest (interior Oregon,Washington and southern British Columbia).Years with widespread fires (35 years with fire at 7 to 11 sites) had warm spring - summers and warm-dry summers, whereas years with no fires at any site (