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Keyword: old growth

Tree and opening spatial patterns vary by tree density in two old-growth remnant ponderosa pine forests in Northern Arizona, USA

Publications Posted on: August 19, 2019
Forest spatial patterns influence many ecological processes in dry conifer forests. Thus, understanding and replicating spatial patterns is critically important in order to make these forests sustainable and more resilient to fire and other disturbances.

Old-growth forests in the Southwest and Rocky Mountain Regions - Proceedings of a workshop

Publications Posted on: December 09, 2016
This paper reviews the science and management of old-growth forests and summarizes discussions among 30 participants at a workshop in Portal, Arizona, March 9-13, 1992. Concepts of old-growth forests - the perceptions, values, definitions, characteristic features, ecological functions, and landscape importance - vary widely.

Field guide to old ponderosa pines in the Colorado Front Range

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We describe the distinguishing physical characteristics of old ponderosa pine trees in the Front Range of Colorado and the ecological processes that tend to preserve them. Photographs illustrate identifying features of old ponderosa pines and show how to differentiate them from mature and young trees. The publication includes a photographic gallery of old ponderosa pine trees growing on poor, moderate, and good sites.

Identification and ecology of old ponderosa pine trees in the Colorado Front Range

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We describe the distinguishing physical characteristics of old ponderosa pine trees in the Front Range of Colorado, the processes that tend to preserve them, their past and present ecological significance, and their role in ecosystem restoration. Photographs illustrate identifying features of old ponderosa pines and show how to differentiate them from mature and young trees.

Oldest known Engelmann spruce

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Age structure in a stand of very old-age Engelmann spruce is described. The site is at 3,505 m near treeline in the Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. The site contains the oldest Engelmann spruce trees yet reported in the literature; the oldest tree is at least 852 years of age.

The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States.

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
This cooperative effort by USDA Forest Service Research and the National Forest System assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of four forest carnivores in the western United States: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine. The conservation assessment reviews the biology and ecology of these species. It also discusses management considerations stemming from what is known and identifies information needed.

The relative impact of harvest and fire upon landscape-level dynamics of older forests: lessons from the Northwest Forest Plan

Publications Posted on: April 07, 2010
Interest in preserving older forests at the landscape level has increased in many regions, including the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) of 1994 initiated a significant reduction in the harvesting of older forests on federal land.

The relative impact of harvest and fire upon landscape-level dynamics of older forests: Lessons from the Northwest Forest Plan

Publications Posted on: November 20, 2009
Interest in preserving older forests at the landscape level has increased in many regions, including the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) of 1994 initiated a significant reduction in the harvesting of older forests on federal land.

Application of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data to estimate the amount of old growth forest and snag density in the Northern Region of the National Forest System

Publications Posted on: January 06, 2009
This report discusses valid use of data produced by the Forest Service?s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program and used by the Northern Region of the National Forest System to analyze the compliance of individual National Forests with their Standards and Guidelines. It emphasizes use of FIA data on snag density and the percentage of forest area that meets the definition of old growth.

Flammulated, boreal, and great gray owls in the United States: A technical conservation assessment

Publications Posted on: October 09, 2007
Flammulated (Otus flammeolus), boreal (Aegolius funereus), and great gray (Strix nebulosa) owls occur over a broad portion of North America and each is designated as a "sensitive species" in four or more USDA Forest Service regions.

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