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Keyword: Northern Great Plains

Investigating new threats from emerging invasive plants

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 05, 2015
Forest Service scientists and partners developed an aggressive approach to investigate the biological and habitat characteristics of sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris), a rapidly expanding invasive plant recently introduced into the grasslands of the northern Great Plains. Documenting patterns of invasion before species becomes widespread and identifying traits that may contribute to the success of recent invaders can increase our knowledge of factors influencing invasibility.

Lack of native vegetation recovery following biological control of leafy spurge

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2010
Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is an aggressive exotic species that has been successfully suppressed in a variety of situations using classical biological control (flea beetles; Aphthona spp.). This 9-yr study investigated patterns of vegetation responses following significant reductions in leafy spurge cover and density by flea beetles in southeastern Montana.

The role of fire in managing for biological diversity on native rangelands of the Northern Great Plains

Publications Posted on: September 19, 2007
A strategy for using fire to manage for biological diversity on native rangelands in the Northern Great Plains incorporates an understanding of its past frequency, timing and intensity. Historically, lightning and humans were the major fire setters, and the role of fire varied both in space and time. A burning regime that includes fires at various intervals, seasons and intensities, including midsummer burns, should be reinstated.

Efficacy of flea beetle control of leafy spurge in Montana and South Dakota

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2007
Black (Aphthona lacertosa and Aphthona czwalinae) and brown (Aphthona nigriscutis) flea beetles are among the more successful biological control agents used in the control and management of leafy spurge on a relatively large scale in the Northern Great Plains.

Scaling-up of CO2 fluxes to assess carbon sequestration in rangelands of Central Asia

Publications Posted on: May 16, 2006
Flux towers provide temporal quantification of local carbon dynamics at specific sites. The number and distribution of flux towers, however, are generally inadequate to quantify carbon fluxes across a landscape or ecoregion. Thus, scaling up of flux tower measurements through use of algorithms developed from remote sensing and GIS data is needed for spatial extrapolation of carbon fluxes and to identify regional sinks and sources of carbon.

Historical variability in fire at the ponderosa pine - northern Great Plains prairie ecotone, southeastern Black Hills, South Dakota

Publications Posted on: May 04, 2006
Ecotones are boundaries between plant assemblages that can represent a physiological or competitive limit of species’ local distributions, usually through one or more biotic or abiotic constraints on species’ resource requirements. However, ecotones also result from the effects of chronic or episodic disturbances, and changes in disturbance regimes may have profound effects on vegetation patterns in transitional areas.

Leafy spurge effects on patterns of plant species richness

Publications Posted on: May 02, 2006
The objective of this study was to simultaneously evaluate the impact of leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) on plant species richness within and among a wide variety of vegetation types typical of the region. The study was conducted in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in southwestern North Dakota where 11 plant associations were identified as being particularly susceptible to invasion by leafy spurge.