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Keyword: nesting habitat

A survey of potential bald eagle nesting habitat along the Great Lakes shoreline

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
We used fixed-wing aircraft to survey the entire shoreline and connecting channels of the five Great Lakes to determine potential nesting habitat for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) during 1992.

Conflicting perspectives on spotted owls, wildfire, and forest restoration

Publications Posted on: February 12, 2018
Evidence of increasing fire extent and severity in the western US in recent decades has raised concern over the effects of fire on threatened species such as the spotted owl (Strix occidentalis Xantus de Vesey), which nests in forests with large trees and high canopy cover that are vulnerable to high-severity wildfire. A dichotomy of views exists on the impact of high-severity wildfire on the spotted owl.

Management recommendations for the northern goshawk in the southwestern United States

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Present forest conditions loss of a herbaceous and shrubby understory, reductions in the amount of older forests, and increased areas of dense tree regeneration reflect the extent of human influence on these forests. These changes may also be affecting goshawk populations.

Ecology of Mexican spotted owls

Media Gallery Posted on: October 05, 2015
RMRS scientists have been involved in Mexican Spotted Owl recovery efforts since before the species was listed as Threatened in 1993. Today, our scientists are developing new knowledge of this owl, synthesizing existing information, and working with land managers to integrate habitat requirements for the owl and its important prey species into management plans.

Ecology of the Mexican Spotted Owl

Projects Posted on: August 14, 2015
Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) scientists have been at the forefront of efforts to understand the ecology of the threatened Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) for more than 25 years. These scientists and their cooperators have produced most of the existing scientific information on this species. Today, RMRS scientists continue to be actively involved in developing new knowledge on this owl, synthesizing existing information, and working with managers to integrate habitat requirements for the owl and its important prey species into land management plans.

Ecology of Mexican spotted owls in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 20, 2015
RMRS scientists recently completed a 10 year study of a population of threatened Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico. This study evaluated demography, habitat use, and diet composition of spotted owls, as well as forest structure characteristic of owl habitat. We determined that most owl nests are located in wet mixed-conifer forests not greatly in need of ecological restoration.

Nesting habitat of Mexican spotted owls in the Sacramento Mountains

Publications Posted on: September 10, 2013
Understanding the habitat relationships of rare species is critical to conserving populations and habitats of those species. Nesting habitat is suspected to limit distribution of the threatened Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida), and may vary among geographic regions. We studied selection of nesting habitat by Mexican spotted owls within their home ranges in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico.

Habitat suitability models for cavity-nesting birds in a postfire landscape

Publications Posted on: January 03, 2008
Models of habitat suitability in postfire landscapes are needed by land managers to make timely decisions regarding postfire timber harvest and other management activities. Many species of cavity-nesting birds are dependent on postfire landscapes for breeding and other aspects of their life history and are responsive to postfire management activities (e.g., timber harvest).

A neotropical migratory bird prioritization for National Forests and Grasslands

Publications Posted on: September 19, 2007
The Rocky Mountain Region of the USDA Forest Service provides nesting habitat for 146 species of neotropical migratory birds. Interactive, prioritization databases were developed for each National Forest and National Grassland in the Region to assist land managers in making informed decisions about resource allocations. The data was processed using Paradox software.

Evaluating Great Lakes bald eagle nesting habitat with Bayesian inference

Publications Posted on: August 08, 2006
Bayesian inference facilitated structured interpretation of a nonreplicated, experience-based survey of potential nesting habitat for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) along the five Great Lakes shorelines.

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