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Keyword: NEPA

Improving long-term fuel treatment effectiveness in the National Forest System through quantitative prioritization

Publications Posted on: October 02, 2019
Predicting the efficacy of fuel treatments aimed at reducing high severity fire in dry-mixed conifer forests in the western US is a challenging problem that has been addressed in a variety of ways using both field observations and wildfire simulation models. One way to describe the efficacy of fuel treatments is to quantify how often wildfires are expected to intersect areas prioritized for treatment.

Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; forest structure and fire hazard fact sheet 01: forest structure and fire hazard overview

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
Many managers and policymakers guided by the National Environmental Policy Act process want to understand the scientific principles on which they can base fuel treatments for reducing the size and severity of wildfires. These Forest Structure and Fire Hazard fact sheets discuss how to estimate fire hazard, how to visualize fuel treatments, and how the role of silviculture can help in managing forests to reduce crown fires.

Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; economic uses fact sheet 05: NEPA and economics

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is the law that requires Federal agencies to consider the environmental impacts of their actions, involve the public in the decisionmaking process, and disclose information, starting at the initial stages of planning.

MODIS-based annual production estimates from 2000-2015 for rangelands in USFS grazing allotments in Region 5

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication contains an ESRI grid dataset describing annual productivity and drought in the non-forest domain of Region 5 (California) of the United States Forest Service (USFS). Production data were generated from the Rangeland Vegetation Simulator (RVS).

Human-side of Restoration Webinar Series

Events Posted on: March 15, 2016
The Human-side of Restoration Webinar Series explored how human communities and individual values, public opinions, and social structures interface with ecological restoration. The series allowed experts from the Rocky Mountain Research Station, other government research organization, universities, and management communities to share their insights and experiences with the “people part” of restoration.

Literature cited during webinar "Sticky legal issues surrounding restoration"

Documents and Media Posted on: March 10, 2016
Presenters cited these sources during the Human-Side of Restoration Webinar Sticky legal issues surrounding restoration: Navigating adaptive management and cumulative effects analysis to satisfy legal requirements and address stakeholder concerns. Document Type: Other Documents

Ethical implications of democratic theory for U.S. public participation in environmental impact assessment

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2012
Traditional mechanisms for public participation in environmental impact assessment under U.S. federal law have been criticized as ineffective and unable to resolve conflict. As these mechanisms are modified and new approaches developed, we argue that participation should be designed and evaluated not only on practical grounds of cost-effectiveness and efficiency, but also on ethical grounds based on democratic ideals.