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Keyword: mixed-conifer forest

Influence of fire refugia spatial pattern on post-fire forest recovery in Oregon’s Blue Mountains

Publications Posted on: August 06, 2019
Context: Fire regimes in many dry forests of western North America are substantially different from historical conditions, and there is concern about the ability of these forests to recover following severe wildfire. Fire refugia, unburned or low-severity burned patches where trees survived fire, may serve as essential propagule sources that enable forest regeneration.

Tree demography records and last recorded fire dates from the Pinaleño Demography Project, Arizona USA

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
This data publication includes tree measurements taken from 2008-2013 across a gradient of forest types in the Pinaleño Mountains in southeastern Arizona, USA. Tree data include: species, pith date, and last recorded fire date. These data were collected as part of the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) Growth and Demography of Pinaleño High Elevation Forests research project.

Tree demography records and last recorded fire dates from the Pinaleño Demography Project, Arizona USA

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2017
Enter summary (recommended) or leave this area entirely blank (delete this content) Text in the summary field displays in listings and provides more information to people browsing the site. Text in the summary field does not appear in the body of the page. Document Type: Other Documents

Forests transformed by fire exclusion help us understand climate resilience

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 06, 2017
The onset of fire exclusion in western North American forests in the late 1800s began one of the largest unintended landscape ecology experiments in human history. The current ecology of these forests and the ecological impacts of returning fire to these forests is strongly influenced by the amount of forest change that has occurred during the fire-free period. Understanding how different forest types responded to fire exclusion is important for implementing management strategies that restore fire as a natural process, promote forest health, and maintain well-functioning forests for future generations.  

Disturbance and productivity interactions mediate stability of forest composition and structure

Publications Posted on: April 14, 2017
Fire is returning to many conifer-dominated forests where species composition and structure have been altered by fire exclusion. Ecological effects of these fires are influenced strongly by the degree of forest change during the fire-free period. Response of fire-adapted species assemblages to extended fire-free intervals is highly variable, even in communities with similar historical fire regimes.

Mixed-conifer forests of central Oregon: Effects of logging and fire exclusion vary with environment

Publications Posted on: October 07, 2015
Twentieth-century land management has altered the structure and composition of mixed-conifer forests and decreased their resilience to fire, drought, and insects in many parts of the Interior West. These forests occur across a wide range of environmental settings and historical disturbance regimes, so their response to land management is likely to vary across landscapes and among ecoregions.

Ecology of Mexican spotted owls in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 20, 2015
RMRS scientists recently completed a 10 year study of a population of threatened Mexican spotted owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico. This study evaluated demography, habitat use, and diet composition of spotted owls, as well as forest structure characteristic of owl habitat. We determined that most owl nests are located in wet mixed-conifer forests not greatly in need of ecological restoration.

Rapid increase in log populations in drought-stressed mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests in northern Arizona

Publications Posted on: May 08, 2012
Down logs provide important ecosystem services in forests and affect surface fuel loads and fire behavior. Amounts and kinds of logs are influenced by factors such as forest type, disturbance regime, forest man-agement, and climate.

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