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Science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome: Linking the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy to long-term strategic conservation actions. Part 2. Management applications

Publications Posted on: April 12, 2019
The Science Framework is intended to link the Department of the Interior’s Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy with long-term strategic conservation and restoration actions in the sagebrush biome. The focus is on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems and sagebrush dependent species with an emphasis on Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

Ecology and management of sand shinnery communities: a literature review

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
Sand shinnery is codominated by oak shrubs and mid and tallgrasses; the grasses are usually taller than the oaks. The shrubs are the small, visible shoots of massive underground stem systems, which are hundreds or thousands of years old. Sand shinnery occupies 5 to 7 M acres in western Oklahoma, western Texas, and southeastern New Mexico.

Projected use of grazed forages in the United States: 2000 to 2050: A technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Scenario analysis techniques were used to combine projections from 35 grazed forage experts to estimate future forage demand scenarios and examine factors that are anticipated to impact the use of grazed forages in the South, North, and West Regions of the United States.

Santa Rita Experimental Range: 100 years (1903 to 2003) of accomplishments and contributions; conference proceedings; 2003 October 30-November 1; Tucson, AZ

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The purpose of this conference was to celebrate the 100 years of accomplishments and contributions of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, the longest continuously operating research area dedicated to the sustainable management of North American rangelands.

Great Basin Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

Publications Posted on: June 27, 2013
This annotated bibliography documents the research that has been conducted on the Great Basin Experimental Range (GBER, also known as the Utah Experiment Station, Great Basin Station, the Great Basin Branch Experiment Station, Great Basin Experimental Center, and other similar name variants) over the 102 years of its existence. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or summaries when those were included in the original document.

Soil temperature and moisture dynamics after experimental irrigation on two contrasting soils on the Santa Rita Experimental Range: Implications for mesquite establishment

Publications Posted on: August 24, 2010
We established a large-scale manipulative experiment in a semidesert grassland on the Santa Rita Experimental Range to determine how the recruitment and physiology of woody plants (Prosopis velutina Woot.) are affected by invasive grasses, seasonal precipitation regimes, and underlying soil characteristics.

Spectral reflectance and soil morphology characteristics of Santa Rita Experimental Range soils

Publications Posted on: August 24, 2010
The Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) soils are mostly transported alluvial sediments that occur on the piedmont slope flanking the Santa Rita Mountains in Arizona. The major geomorphic land forms are alluvial fans or fan terraces, but there are also areas of residual soils formed on granite and limestone bedrock, basin floor, stream terraces, and flood plains.

Sweet resin bush on the Santa Rita Experimental Range: An eradication effort

Publications Posted on: August 24, 2010
Sweet resin bush (Euryops subcarnosus DC ssp. vulgaris B. Nord; or, Euryops multifidis (L. f.) DC.), a South African shrub introduced to Arizona in the 1930s, was discovered on the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) in 1998.

Soil and ecological sites of the Santa Rita Experimental Range

Publications Posted on: August 24, 2010
A soil survey and rangeland resource inventory of the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) was conducted by staff from the Tucson office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) during April and May of 1997. Thirty-two soils series and taxadjuncts were mapped on the SRER and delineated in 24 different mapping units.

Historical and recent flora of the Santa Rita Experimental Range

Publications Posted on: August 24, 2010
The historical flora of the Santa Rita Experimental Range was composed from historical lists of plants collected by various investigators since 1903. Plant accessions were verified from lists of plant specimens housed at the Rocky Mountain Research Station herbarium in Flagstaff, AZ, and the Rocky Mountain National Herbarium in Laramie, WY.

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