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Keyword: landscape management

Incorporating ecological and nonecological concerns in the restoration of a rare, high-elevation Bebb willow riparian community

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Activities were initiated by The Nature Conservancy, the USDA Forest Service, and the Northern Arizona University School of Forestry and Department of Geology in 1996 to restore hydrologic and ecological function to a high-elevation Bebb willow (Salix bebbiana) and mixed grass riparian community in Hart Prairie, near Flagstaff, AZ.

Ecological wilderness restoration: Attitudes toward restoring the Mount Logan Wilderness

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
By law, wilderness areas are intended to be unmarred landscapes where evidence of modern civilization is generally absent. This presents a problem, since ecological wilderness conditions have been impaired by human activities. For example, some forest wilderness ecosystems have been altered by livestock grazing, logging, fire exclusion, and through other environmental manipulations.

Problem solving or social change? The Applegate and Grand Canyon Forest Partnerships

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Natural resource conflicts have resulted in attempts at better collaboration between public and private sectors. The resulting partnerships approach collaboration either by problem solving through better information and management, or by requiring substantial social change. The Applegate Partnership in Oregon and the Grand Canyon Forest Partnership in Arizona illustrate each approach.

Upper South Platte Watershed Protection and Restoration Project

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
The Upper South Platte Basin is a critical watershed in Colorado. Nearly 80 percent of the water used by the 1.5 million Denver metropolitan residents comes from or is transmitted through this river drainage. The Colorado Unified Watershed Assessment identified the Upper South Platte River as a Category 1 watershed in need of restoration. Most of the river basin is located within the Pike National Forest southwest of the city of Denver.

Alternative ponderosa pine restoration treatments in the western United States

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Compared to presettlement times, many ponderosa pine forests of the United States are now more dense and have greater quantities of fuels. Widespread treatments are needed in these forests to restore ecological integrity and to reduce the risk of uncharacteristically severe fires. Among possible restorative treatments, however, the appropriate balance among cuttings, mechanical fuel treatments, and prescribed fire is often unclear.

Can we create and sustain late successional attributes in interior ponderosa pine stands? Large-scale ecological research studies in northeastern California

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Conflicts over changing demands on our increasingly scarce stands of late successional ponderosa pine could be abated by increasing the proportion of stands with late successional attributes in the forest land base. However, we don't know whether these attributes can be developed through the management of younger stands. Nor do we know whether late successional stands can be managed to perpetuate these values through time.

Habitat associations of the sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus graciosus): Potential responses of an ectotherm to ponderosa pine forest restoration treatments

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
Little is known about the response of ectotherms to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) restoration treatments. The ambient body temperature of an ectotherm affects its physiology, development, and behavior. Microhabitat availability and heterogeneity are critical factors in determining which thermoregulation choices are available to a terrestrial ectotherm (Stevenson 1985).

Butterfly response and successional change following ecosystem restoration

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
The Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) can be useful indicators of ecosystem change as a result of a disturbance event. We monitored changes in butterfly abundance in two restoration treatment units paired with adjacent untreated forest at the Mt. Trumbull Resource Conservation Area in northern Arizona.

Plant community responses to livestock grazing: An assessment of alternative management practices in a semiarid grassland

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
One of the most prevalent land-use practices in the American Southwest, and one of the most contentious issues among land-use policymakers, is the grazing of domestic livestock. In an effort to contribute scientific understanding to this debate, we have designed experiments comparing the effects of alternative grazing regimes on plant communities.

Effect of restoration thinning on mycorrhizal fungal propagules in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest: Preliminary results

Publications Posted on: September 24, 2014
The inoculum potential for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi were investigated in thinned and uncut control stands in a northern Arizona ponderosa pine forest. A corn bioassay was used to determine the relative amount of infective propagules of AM fungi, and a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) bioassay was used to determine the relative amount of infective propagules of EM fungi.

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