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Keyword: landscape management

Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
This volume is divided into three sections: (1) Ecological, Biological, and Physical Science; (2) Social and Cultural; and (3) Economics and Utilization. Effective ecological restoration requires a combination of science and management.

NorWeST stream temperature data summaries for the western U.S.

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
NorWeST is an interagency stream temperature database and model for the western United States containing data from over 20,000 unique stream locations. Temperature observations were solicited from state, federal, tribal, private, and municipal resource organizations and processed using a custom cleaning script developed by Gwynne Chandler. Summaries of daily, weekly, and monthly means, minima, and maxima are provided for observation years.

NorWeST modeled summer stream temperature scenarios for the western U.S.

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
NorWeST summer stream temperature scenarios were developed for all rivers and streams in the western U.S. from the > 20,000 stream sites in the NorWeST database where mean August stream temperatures were recorded.

Species occurrence data from the Range-Wide Bull Trout eDNA Project

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
The bull trout is an ESA-listed species with a historical range that encompasses many waters across the Northwest. Though once abundant, bull trout have declined in many locations and are at risk from a changing climate, nonnative species, and habitat degradation.

Land status

Pages Posted on: February 06, 2017
In order to engage in landscape-scale management, planners must understand the complex relationships of land status, ownership, use, and access. These publications and tools include valuable information regarding land status. 

Wildfire Hazard Potential (WHP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2014 classified

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
Federal wildfire managers often want to know, over large landscapes, where wildfires are likely to occur and how intense they may be. To meet this need we developed a map that we call wildfire hazard potential (WHP) – a raster geospatial product that can help to inform evaluations of wildfire risk or prioritization of fuels management needs across very large spatial scales (millions of acres).

Wildfire Hazard Potential (WHP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2014 continuous

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
Federal wildfire managers often want to know, over large landscapes, where wildfires are likely to occur and how intense they may be. To meet this need we developed a map that we call wildfire hazard potential (WHP) – a raster geospatial product that can help to inform evaluations of wildfire risk or prioritization of fuels management needs across very large spatial scales (millions of acres).

Wildland Fire Potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2012 continuous

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
The wildland fire potential (WFP) map is a raster geospatial product produced by the USDA Forest Service, Fire Modeling Institute that is intended to be used in analyses of wildfire risk or hazardous fuels prioritization at large landscapes (100s of square miles) up through regional or national scales.

Wildland Fire Potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2012 classified

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
The wildland fire potential (WFP) map is a raster geospatial product produced by the USDA Forest Service, Fire Modeling Institute that is intended to be used in analyses of wildfire risk or hazardous fuels prioritization at large landscapes (100s of square miles) up through regional or national scales.

Ecology of Mexican spotted owls

Media Gallery Posted on: October 05, 2015
RMRS scientists have been involved in Mexican Spotted Owl recovery efforts since before the species was listed as Threatened in 1993. Today, our scientists are developing new knowledge of this owl, synthesizing existing information, and working with land managers to integrate habitat requirements for the owl and its important prey species into management plans.

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