You are here

Keyword: Landfire

Correction to: A case study comparison of LANDFIRE fuel loading and emissions generation on a mixed conifer forest in Northern Idaho, USA

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
Following publication of the original article (Hyde et al., 2015), the authors have noticed two errors in the summarizing of our results and wish to point out the following corrections.

Strategic wildfire risk: Aligning wildfire response actions with land and resource planning

Projects Posted on: February 13, 2019
Large wildfires are inherently more complex; often affecting multiple jurisdictions and requiring a balance of strategic long-term planning and nimble tactical solutions to meet dynamic conditions on the ground. With this increase in complexity comes increased uncertainty.

Real-time identification of wildfire responder hazards and operational engagement opportunities

Projects Posted on: February 13, 2019
The increasing complexity of the wildfire management environment has also created challenges for managing the exposure of wildfire responders to operational hazards. Firefighting is an inherently high-risk occupation and the fire environment is fraught with hazards that consistently cause injuries and fatalities each year. While some number of these hazards can be mitigated with improved safety equipment, communications, and safety protocols once responders are deployed. It is up to the fire command staff to determine, where and under what conditions the risk/benefit trade off of deploying boots on the ground makes sense.

Facilitating pre-season planning to identify control opportunities and high priority areas

Projects Posted on: February 13, 2019
District and Forest Fire staff recently met with local cooperators and resource specialists to develop maps of potential control lines that they could use while managing a fire. Maps of control lines and potential operational delineations (PODs) are being developed for the entire Forest with the assistance of researchers from USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station and the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute.

Fire and forethought: Fire effects syntheses are a powerful tool for planning and management across resource fields

Pages Posted on: April 04, 2018
http://www.feis-crs.org/feis/The Rocky Mountain Research Station’s Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) team synthesizes information about wildland fires, their history in U.S. ecosystems, and their effects on U.S. wildland plants, lichens, and animals. Found at www.feis-crs.org/feis/, FEIS publications can be used for many purposes, including land use planning, restoration and rehabilitation planning, wildlife and range projects, and related environmental assessments and impact statements. While traditionally used for fire management decisions, FEIS can also be used for NEPA, restoration, and other planning needs by managers in other resource fields, including wildlife, plants, soils, hydrology, and roads.

Fire Lab tree list: A tree-level model of the western US circa 2009 v1

Datasets Posted on: March 15, 2018
Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for many applications such as estimating terrestrial carbon resources, predicting tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory.

Beyond fuel treatment effectiveness: Characterizing interactions between fire and treatments in the US

Publications Posted on: November 18, 2016
In the United States, fuel reduction treatments are a standard land management tool to restore the structure and composition of forests that have been degraded by past management. Although treatments can have multiple purposes, their principal objective is to create landscape conditions where wildland fire can be safely managed to help achieve long-term land management goals.

Mapping forest vegetation for the western United States using modified random forests imputation of FIA forest plots

Publications Posted on: October 25, 2016
Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for many applications such as estimating terrestrial carbon resources, predicting tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory.

A tree-level model of forests in the western United States

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 14, 2016
https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53114Maps of the number, size, and species of trees in forests across the western United States are desirable for a number of applications including estimating terrestrial carbon resources, tree mortality following wildfires, and for forest inventory. However, detailed mapping of trees for large areas is not feasible with current technologies. We used a statistical method called random forests for matching forest plot data with biophysical characteristics of the landscape in order to populate entire landscapes with a limited set of forest plot inventory data. 

Modeling, assessment, and planning to support fire management decisions

Projects Posted on: May 02, 2016
Effective and efficient risk-based management requires integrated knowledge, systems and planning tools that explore the interaction of the full range of land and fire management activities. The Wildfire Risk Management team is working to develop and demonstrate the power of integrating fire-risk science across the full range of fire management activities. This work will include the first pilot study of changes in wildfire risk across time, using the prototype LANDFIRE time series dataset, created specifically for the study landscape.

Pages