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Keyword: land cover

Benefits of the free and open Landsat data policy

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
The United States (U.S.) federal government provides imagery obtained by federally funded Earth Observation satellites typically at no cost. For many years Landsat was an exception to this trend, until 2008 when the United States Geological Survey (USGS) made Landsat data accessible via the internet for free.

Quality control and assessment of interpreter consistency of annual land cover reference data in an operational national monitoring program

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2019
The U.S. Geological Survey Land Change Monitoring, Assessment and Projection (USGS LCMAP) initiative is working toward a comprehensive capability to characterize land cover and land cover change using dense Landsat time series data. A suite of products including annual land cover maps and annual land cover change maps will be produced using the Landsat 4-8 data record.

Composition and structure of forest fire refugia: What are the ecosystem legacies across burned landscapes?

Publications Posted on: August 17, 2018
Locations within forest fires that remain unburned or burn at low severity—known as fire refugia - are important components of contemporary burn mosaics, but their composition and structure at regional scales are poorly understood.

Improved prediction of stream flow based on updating land cover maps with remotely sensed forest change detection

Publications Posted on: July 06, 2018
The water balance in a watershed can be disrupted by forest disturbances such as harvests and fires. Techniques to accurately and efficiently map forest cover changes due to disturbance are evolving quickly, and it is of interest to ask how useful maps of different types of disturbances over time can be in the prediction of water yield. We assessed the benefits of using land cover maps produced at annual vs.

Recognizing loss of open forest ecosystems by tree densification and land use intensification in the Midwestern USA

Publications Posted on: April 12, 2018
Forests and grasslands have changed during the past 200 years in the eastern USA, and it is now possible to quantify loss and conversion of vegetation cover at regional scales. We quantified historical (ca. 1786-1908) and current land cover and determined long-term ecosystem change to either land use or closed forests in eight states of the Great Lakes and Midwest.

Housing development erodes avian community structure in U.S. protected areas

Publications Posted on: October 30, 2015
Protected areas are a cornerstone for biodiversity conservation, but they also provide amenities that attract housing development on inholdings and adjacent private lands. We explored how this development affects biodiversity within and near protected areas among six ecological regions throughout the United States.

Rapid response tools and datasets for post-fire modeling: Linking Earth Observations and process-based hydrological models to support post-fire remediation

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2015
Preparation is key to utilizing Earth Observations and process-based models to support post-wildfire mitigation. Post-fire flooding and erosion can pose a serious threat to life, property and municipal water supplies. Increased runoff and sediment delivery due to the loss of surface cover and fire-induced changes in soil properties are of great concern.

Bird biodiversity in the wildland urban interface

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 30, 2015
Housing development has been particularly strong near protected lands because many people see these environments as desirable places to live. This study documented the trends in new home construction near protected lands and explored if this housing development impacted biodiversity of avian species within protected areas.

Digital surface, terrain, and canopy height models for the Bannock Creek unit of Boise Basin Experimental Forest in 2007

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
The data publication contains 1 meter raster data sets for three different digital elevation models (DEM) for the Bannock Creek unit of the Boise Basin Experimental Forest in south central Idaho in November 2007. The first is a digital terrain model (DTM), which is the ground surface with all vegetation and human-made structures removed. The second is a digital surface model (DSM), which includes all vegetation and human-made structures.

Digital surface, terrain, and canopy height models for a portion of the Black Hills Experimental Forest in 2002

Datasets Posted on: August 27, 2015
The data publication contains 1 meter raster data sets for three different digital elevation models (DEM) for a portion of the Black Hills Experimental Forest in South Dakota in 2002. The first is a digital terrain model (DTM), which is the ground surface with all vegetation and human-made structures removed. The second is a digital surface model (DSM), which includes all vegetation and human-made structures.

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