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Keyword: Intermountain West

Population history provides foundational knowledge for utilizing and developing native plant restoration materials

Publications Posted on: December 06, 2018
A species’ population structure and history are critical pieces of information that can help guide the use of available native plant materials in restoration treatments and decide what new native plant materials should be developed to meet future restoration needs.

Environmental, structural, and disturbance influences over forest floor components in interior Douglas-fir forests of the Intermountain West, USA

Publications Posted on: August 21, 2018
Downed woody material (DWM) is a key component in forest ecosystems with age, structure, and disturbance described as primary factors that influence DWM dynamics. In particular, much emphasis is placed on large coarse woody debris (CWD).

Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Changes in fire patterns for piñon and juniper vegetation in the western United States were analyzed over a 30-year period. This is the first evaluation of its type.

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Media Gallery Posted on: May 11, 2017
Native plant community restoration is a vital tool for preserving and maintaining diverse ecosystems that support wildlife and provide ecosystem functions essential to healthy human communities. The success of restoration projects depends on using plant materials that are adapted to local environmental and climatic conditions. Seed transfer guidelines and seed zones help land managers in selecting the right seed for the right place. To learn more about this see Science Spotlight: The Right Seed At The Right Place

The Right Seed At The Right Place

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 11, 2017
Native plant community restoration is a vital tool for preserving and maintaining diverse ecosystems that support wildlife and provide ecosystem functions essential to healthy human communities. The success of restoration projects depends on using plant materials that are adapted to local environmental and climatic conditions. Seed transfer guidelines and seed zones help land managers in selecting the right seed for the right place.

Survey responses from the Intermountain West: Are we achieving the public's objectives for forests and rangelands?

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
The survey on values, objectives, beliefs, and attitudes, implemented as a module of the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment, asked over 7,000 respondents nationwide about their values with respect to public lands, objectives for the management of these lands, beliefs about the role the USDA Forest Service should play in fulfilling those objectives, and attitudes about the job the agency has been doing. This report ?

New research on resilience of sagebrush ecosystems used for improving sage-grouse habitat

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 09, 2015
New research from the Rocky Mountain Research Station on sagebrush ecosystems is being put to use to benefit Greater Sage-Grouse habitat on federal lands across the intermountain west.  An interagency effort initiated by the Western Association of Wildlife agencies and led by Grasslands, Shrublands, and Deserts Program Scientist, Jeanne Chambers, was used to develop a strategy for decreasing the impacts of invasive grasses and wildland fire on sage-grouse habitat. 

Science You Can Use Lunch Date: Burgeoning Biomass

Events Posted on: December 03, 2014
 Webinar: The Restoration Economy: Cost-benefit Analyses and Payments for Ecosystem Services. December 4, 2014, 11:00 - 12:30 (Mountain). This is the next in the Human-side of Restoration Webinar Series

Learning to live with cheatgrass: Giving up or a necessary paradigm shift?

Publications Posted on: September 16, 2014
Natural ecosystems in the semiarid West face many stressors. Among the most challenging are those associated with invasive plant species. One invader that has had great impact over the last 100 years is the annual grass known as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). A few years ago, I made two observations that both confirmed and broadened my perception of this plant.

Non-native plants and wildlife in the Intermountain West

Publications Posted on: October 01, 2013
Non-native plant invasions can change communities and ecosystems by altering the structure and composition of native vegetation. Changes in native plant communities caused by non-native plants can influence native wildlife species in diverse ways, but the outcomes and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood.

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