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Keyword: hydrologic modeling

Using Forest Inventory & Analysis data for broad-scale assessments of vegetation effects on water resources

Projects Posted on: April 29, 2019
Forest canopies exert a physical influence on the partitioning of precipitation into runoff versus evapotranspiration through several hydrologic processes. This project seeks to illuminate the ways that forest dynamics and disturbance affect hydrologic processes and availability of water for ecosystems and for people.  

Science briefing: Western U.S. stream flow metric dataset

Documents and Media Posted on: July 09, 2015
Short summary of project that estimated mean annual flow, mean timing of runoff, and winter frequency of high flows for streams in six major river basins of the western U.S. under historical and future climate change scenarios. Document Type: Briefing Papers

Using WEPP technology to predict erosion and runoff following wildfire

Publications Posted on: March 24, 2015
Erosion following wildfire can be as much as 1000 times the erosion from an undisturbed forest. In August, 2005, the largest fire in the lower 48 states occurred in the Umatilla National Forest in Southeast Washington. Researchers from the Rocky Mountain Research Station assisted the forest in estimating soil erosion using three different applications of the WEPP model. GeoWEPP was used to determine the onsite distribution of soil erosion.

Stream flow metrics for historical and future climate change scenarios

Projects Posted on: January 23, 2015
Climate change is projected to alter the flow regimes of streams and rivers, with consequences for physical processes and aquatic organisms. Our stream flow dataset makes it possible to study the effects of droughts, changes in snowpack, water resource impacts, and other hydrologic changes under historical and future climate change scenarios.

Validating western United States stream flow metric dataset

Documents and Media Posted on: January 23, 2015
Final report for a project conducting additional validations of outputs from the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model for the area around the Shoshone National Forest. Modeled predictions were compared to observed USGS gage data at selected locations. In addition, VIC model performance was compared to that of hydrologic outputs from MC1, a dynamic model that simulates vegetation, carbon, hydrology and fire processes. Document Type: White Papers

Applying online WEPP to assess forest watershed hydrology

Publications Posted on: June 28, 2013
A new version of the online Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) GIS interface has been developed to assist in evaluating sediment sources associated with forests and forest management within the Great Lakes basin.

Modifying WEPP to improve streamflow simulation in a Pacific Northwest watershed

Publications Posted on: June 28, 2013
The assessment of water yield from hillslopes into streams is critical in managing water supply and aquatic habitat. Streamflow is typically composed of surface runoff, subsurface lateral flow, and groundwater baseflow; baseflow sustains the stream during the dry season. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model simulates surface runoff, subsurface lateral flow, soil water, and deep percolation.

Applying online WEPP to assess forest watershed hydrology

Publications Posted on: September 06, 2012
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Great Lakes Commission are developing technologies and predictive tools to aid in watershed management with an ultimate goal of improving and preserving the water quality in the Great Lakes Basin.

Application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model to simulate streamflow in a PNW forest watershed

Publications Posted on: September 06, 2012
Assessment of water yields from watersheds into streams and rivers is critical to managing water supply and supporting aquatic life. Surface runoff typically contributes the most to peak discharge of a hydrograph while subsurface flow dominates the falling limb of hydrograph and baseflow contributes to streamflow from shallow unconfined aquifers primarily during the non-rainy season.

Applying WEPP technologies to western alkaline surface coal mines

Publications Posted on: September 06, 2012
One aspect of planning surface mining operations, regulated by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), is estimating potential environmental impacts during mining operations and the reclamation period that follows. Practical computer simulation tools are effective for evaluating site-specific sediment control and reclamation plans for the NPDES.

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