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Keyword: high elevation five-needle pines

Ex Situ gene conservation in high elevation white pine species in the United States-a beginning

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
The eight white pine species native to the western United States face an array of biotic and abiotic challenges that impact the viability of populations or the species themselves. Well-established programs are already in place to conserve and restore Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don and P. lambertiana Dougl. throughout significant portions of their geographic ranges. More recently, programs have been initiated for the other six species: P.

A population genetic model for high-elevation five-needle pines: Projecting population outcomes in the presence of white pine blister rust

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
The slow growth and long generation time of the five-needle pines have historically enabled these trees to persist on the landscape for centuries, but without sufficient regeneration opportunities these same traits hinder the species' ability to adapt to novel stresses such as the non-native disease white pine blister rust (WPBR).

A sugar pine consensus map: Comparative mapping between the Pinus subgenus Pinus and the subgenus Strobus

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
We have constructed a consensus genetic linkage map for sugar pine using three mapping populations that segregate for resistance to white pine blister rust, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola. The major gene of resistance, Cr1, was mapped in two of the populations and included in the consensus map, which contains 400 markers organized into 19 linkage groups.

Genetic variation of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) provenances and families from Oregon and Washington in juvenile height growth and needle color

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
A three year common garden study was conducted on whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) which included 215 families from the eight provenances or seed zones in Oregon and Washington. Total height and needle color were assessed. Height differed significantly among provenances and families, and was primarily associated with source elevation, longitude, and precipitation. A moderate to high heritability was estimated for total height.

Molecular genetic variation in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) in the Inland West

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Levels of genetic variation within and among 163 individual- tree collections and one bulk lot of whitebark pine were estimated using isozymes, mitochondrial DNA and chloroplast DNA; 79 of the samples are also part of a common garden study evaluating survival, rust resistance, late winter cold hardiness, and early height-growth.

Conservation genetics of high elevation five-needle white pines

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Conservation genetics examines the biophysical factors influencing genetic processes and uses that information to conserve and maintain the evolutionary potential of species and populations. Here we review published and unpublished literature on the conservation genetics of seven North American high-elevation five-needle pines.

The use of verbenone to protect whitebark pine from mountain pine beetle

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Verbenone is a known anti-aggregation pheromone of mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and has been tested in protecting susceptible host trees from attack since 1988.

Protecting whitebark pines through a mountain pine beetle epidemic with verbenone-is it working?

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
We initiated a multi-year project to protect individual cone-bearing whitebark pines (Pinus albicaulis) from mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae (Hopkins), attack with the anti-aggregating pheromone, verbenone (4,5,5-trimethylbicyclo [3.1.1] hept-3-en-2-one). Our objective was to protect trees through the course of the epidemic that began ca. 2000 in central Idaho.

Health of whitebark pine forests after mountain pine beetle outbreaks

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), a keystone high-elevation species, is currently at risk due to a combination of white pine blister rust (WPBR) (Cronartium ribicola), forest succession, and outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae). While recent mortality is often quantified by aerial detection surveys (ADS) or ground surveys, little information is presented to describe what stands look like following MPB outbreaks.

Mountain pine beetle in high-elevation five-needle white pine ecosystems

Publications Posted on: June 30, 2011
Across western North America mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), populations are growing at exponential rates in pine ecosystems that span a wide range of elevations. As temperature increased over the past several decades, the flexible, thermally-regulated life-history strategies of mountain pine beetle have allowed for increased population success in numerous habitats.

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