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Keyword: heritage resources

Southern Nevada ecosystem stressors [Chapter 2]

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada ecosystems and their associated resources are subject to a number of global and regional/local stressors that are affecting the sustainability of the region. Global stressors include elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and associated changes in temperature and precipitation patterns and amounts, solar radiation, and nutrient cycles (Smith and others 2009b).

An overview of the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis [Chapter 1]

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada is characterized by an arid to semi-arid environment with numerous cultural resources and a high level of biological diversity. Since 1980, the human population of the region has increased at unprecedented rates largely due to the expansion of suburban areas (Hughson 2009).

The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada - Executive Summary

Publications Posted on: July 29, 2013
This synthesis provides information related to the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership (SNAP) Science and Research Strategy Goal 1 - to restore, sustain and enhance southern Nevada’s ecosystems - and Goal 2 - to provide for responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands in a manner that preserves heritage resources and promotes an understanding of human interaction with the landscape.

The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada

Publications Posted on: July 26, 2013
This synthesis provides information related to the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership (SNAP) Science and Research Strategy Goal 1 - to restore, sustain and enhance southern Nevada’s ecosystems - and Goal 2 - to provide for responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands in a manner that preserves heritage resources and promotes an understanding of human interaction with the landscape.

Implications of fire management on cultural resources [Chapter 9]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Previous chapters in this synthesis have identified the important fuel, weather, and fire relationships associated with damage to cultural resources (CR). They have also identified the types of effects commonly encountered in various fire situations and provided some guidance on how to recognize damages and minimize their occurrence.

Effects of fire on intangible cultural resources: Moving toward a landscape approach [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Long before the Secretaries of the Departments of Agriculture and Interior signed the Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy in 1995, most land and resource professionals in the United States had recognized unprecedented fuel accumulations in western forests as management priorities.

The effects of fire on subsurface archaeological materials [Chapter 7]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
In this chapter, we concentrate on the effects of fire on subsurface archaeological deposits: the matrix containing post-depositional fill, artifacts, ecofactual data, dating samples, and other cultural and noncultural materials. In order to provide a context for understanding these data, this paper provides a summary of previous research about the potential effects of fire on subsurface cultural materials.

Fire effects on materials of the historic period [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
In a literal sense "historical artifacts" and "historical sites" are all artifacts and sites dating after the introduction of written history in any region. For example, in New Mexico, these would be sites dating after AD 1540, the year of the first Spanish entrada into what would later become the State of New Mexico.

Fire effects on rock images and similar cultural resources [Chapter 5]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Throughout human global history, people have purposely altered natural rock surfaces by drilling, drawing, painting, incising, pecking, abrading and chiseling images into stone. Some rock types that present suitable media surfaces for these activities are fine-grained sandstones and granites, basalts, volcanic tuff, dolomites, and limestones.

Fire effects on flaked stone, ground stone, and other stone artifacts [Chapter 4]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Lithic artifacts can be divided into two broad classes, flaked stone and ground stone, that overlap depending on the defining criteria. For this discussion, flaked stone is used to describe objects that cut, scrape, pierce, saw, hack, etch, drill, or perforate, and the debris (debitage) created when these items are manufactured.

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