You are here

Keyword: herbicides

Region 4 Science Partner Programs: Cheatgrass seedling reduction for restoration of native sagebrush grassland plant communities

Projects Posted on: March 25, 2019
RMRS scientists have teamed up with managers and researchers at Bridger-Teton National Forest and Colorado State University to compare herbicide treatments to reduce cheatgrass seedlings, allowing restoration of Native Sagebrush Grassland Plant Communities. ​

Panel Discussion: Application of Living Mulch for Spring-Sown Loblolly Pine

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Those who grow hardwood seedlings are familiar with fall sowing seeds and using rye, wheat, or oats to over-winter the crop. Throughout this paper, reference to rye is GRAIN, NOT GRASS (do not use rye grass). The rye stabilizes and insulates the beds while retarding predation and weeds.

Panel Discussion: Using Shielded Sprayers to Control Weeds in Nursery Beds

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Shielded sprayers have proven to be more effective than mechanical-type machines at controlling weeds in hardwood crops. Hand weeding times are reduced significantly, lowering costs and saving time for nursery personnel to do other jobs.Individual papers from this publication

Weed Control in Bareroot Hardwood Nurseries

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Managers in the southern United States rely on chemical and non-chemical methods of weed control. Chemical treatments include fumigation with methyl bromide and chloropicrin in combination with selective herbicides. If methyl bromide is no longer produced in the future, the amount of handweeding will likely increase unless managers adapt to the change. Some nursery managers will increase use of both sanitation practices and herbicides.

Panel Discussion: Weed Control Practices in Seedbeds of Deciduous Trees and Shrubs in the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Nursery Program

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
A summary of weed control practices used in seedbeds of deciduous species at Indiana Department of Natural Resources nurseries is presented.Individual papers from this publication

Panel Discussion: Weed Management

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Successful weed management must be an incorporation of techniques and ideas. Habitual practices of cleaning equipment, using the proper cover crop, spraying small amounts of herbicides early and more often, timing of applications, and the use of the correct mulch/resin are all important lines of attack in keeping the nursery free of competing vegetation.

A comprehensive guide to fuel management practices for dry mixed conifer forests in the northwestern United States: Mechanical, chemical, and biological fuel treatment methods

Publications Posted on: March 31, 2014
Several mechanical approaches to managing vegetation fuels hold promise when applied to the dry mixed conifer forests in the western United States. These are most useful to treat surface, ladder, and crown fuels. There are a variety of techniques to remove or alter all kinds of plant biomass (live, dead, or decomposed) that affect forest resilience.

Tolerance of seven native forbs to preemergence and postemergence herbicides

Publications Posted on: November 18, 2009
Native forb seed is needed to restore rangelands of the Intermountain West. Commercial seed production is necessary to provide the quantity of seed needed for restoration efforts. A major limitation to economically viable commercial production of native forb seed is weed competition. Weeds are adapted to growing in disturbed soil, and native forbs are not competitive with these weeds.

Native wildflowers grown for seed production show tolerance to conventional postemergence herbicides

Publications Posted on: September 25, 2009
Native forb seed is needed to restore rangelands of the Intermountain West. Commercial seed production is necessary to provide the quantity of seed needed for restoration efforts. A major limitation to economically viable commercial production of native forb seed is weed competition. Weeds are adapted to growing in disturbed soil, and native forbs are not competitive with these weeds.

A century of progress in weed control in hardwood seedbeds

Publications Posted on: May 19, 2009
Weeds have existed in nurseries since before the time Bartram grew hardwoods during the 18th century. Hand weeding was the primary method of weed control during the first part of the 20th century. From 1931 to 1970, advances in chemistry increased the use of herbicides, and advances in engineering increased the reliance on machines for cultivation.

Pages