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Keyword: Hayman Fire

Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 1: Historical (pre-1860) and current (1860-2002) fire regimes

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
To address historical and current fire regimes in the Hayman landscape, we first present the concepts of “historical range of variability” and ”fire regime” to provide the necessary conceptual tools for evaluating fire occurrence, fire behavior, and fire effects.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 6: Daily emissions

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
Biomass burning is a major source of many atmospheric trace gases and aerosol particles (Crutzen and Andreae 1990). These compounds and particulates affect public health, regional air quality, air chemistry, and global climate. It is difficult to assess quantitatively the impact wildfires have on the environment because of the uncertainty in determining the size of burned areas and the amount of emitted pollutants and greenhouse gases.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 5: Fire suppression activities

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
The purpose of this report is to document the suppression actions taken during the Hayman Fire. The long duration of suppression activities (June 8 through July 18), and multiple incident management teams assigned to the fire, makes this a challenging task. Original records and reports produced independently by the various teams assigned to different portions of the Hayman Fire had different reference locations and time frames.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 4: Relation of roads to burn severity

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
Effects of roads on fire behavior intensity and severity can be studied directly or indirectly. A direct study of road effects would include uses by fire suppression, burnout operations, and delay of fire progress at the roadside. Interpretations after the fire burns are easily confounded by the unknown nature of suppression activities and fire arrival time, and fire behavior. Indirect study of road effects is by association.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 3: Effects of fuel treatments on fire severity

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
The role played by the fuel conditions within the Hayman Fire severity was complex and does not lend itself to a single conclusion or simple summary. Uncertainties in the original treatment prescription, its implementation, discerning the coverage, extent, and condition at the time of the fire made it difficult for us to clearly determine treatment effects and relate them to treatment type or amount.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 2: Description and interpretations of fire behavior

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
This report summarizes the progress of the Hayman Fire, its behavior, and the influence of environmental conditions. Data were obtained from narratives from fire behavior analysts assigned to the fire management teams, discussions with fire management staff, meteorology from local weather stations and Bradshaw and others (2003), photographs, satellite imagery, and public internet sites.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire - Part 1: Fire weather, meteorology, and climate

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
The Hayman Fire in June 2002 was heavily influenced by antecedent regional weather conditions, culminating in a series of daily weather events that aligned to produce widely varying fire behavior.

Fire behavior, fuel treatments, and fire suppression on the Hayman Fire

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
The Hayman Fire started on June 8, 2002, about 1.5 miles southwest of Tappan Mountain on the south side of County Highway 77, in Park County, Colorado (fig. 1). It was first reported at about 1 acre in size at approximately 1655 hours (appendix C). An aggressive initial attack response consisted of air tankers, helicopters, engines, and ground crews, but they were unable to contain the fire.

Hayman Fire case study: Summary [RMRS-GTR-114]

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2007
Historically, wildfires burned Western forests creating and maintaining a variety of forest compositions and structures (Agee 1993). Prior to European settlement lightning along with Native Americans ignited fires routinely across many forested landscapes. After Euro-American settlement, fires continued to be quite common with fires ignited by settlers, railroads, and lightning (Pyne 2001).

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