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Keyword: haplotype

Hybridization between Dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Media Gallery Posted on: May 12, 2017
Two closely related invasive Linaria species, Dalmatian toadflax and yellow toadflax, have successfully invaded a broad range of ecosystems throughout most of continental North America. The management challenge imposed by the landscape scale of many toadflax infestations, particularly in the West, is further complicated by hybridization between these two weeds.

Looks aren’t everything: Hybridization between dalmatian and yellow toadflax

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 11, 2017
Two closely related invasive Linaria species, Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria Dalmatica) and yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), have successfully invaded a broad range of ecosystems throughout most of continental North America. The management challenge imposed by the landscape scale of many toadflax infestations, particularly in the West, is further complicated by hybridization between these two weeds. Herbicide and biological control treatments for invasive Linaria are highly species-specific, necessitating the development of a molecular diagnostic tool to accurately confirm when cryptic hybridization has spontaneously occurred in the field, and habitat suitability modeling to predict areas most vulnerable to hybrid invasion.

Plastid DNA analysis reveals cryptic hybridization in invasive dalmatian toadflax populations

Publications Posted on: July 28, 2016
Gene flow between Dalmatian toadflax (DT) and yellow toadflax (YT), both aggressive invaders throughout the Intermountain West, is creating hybrid populations potentially more invasive than either parent species. To determine the direction of gene flow in these hybrid populations, species-diagnostic cytoplasmic markers were developed.

Recovery of wolverines in the western United States: recent extirpation and recolonization or range retraction and expansion?

Publications Posted on: January 26, 2015
Wolverines were greatly reduced in number and possibly extirpated from the contiguous United States (U.S.) by the early 1900s. Wolverines currently occupy much of their historical range in Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, but are absent from Utah and only single individuals are known to occur in California and Colorado. In response, the translocation of wolverines to California and Colorado is being considered.

Recovery of wolverines in the western United States: Recent extirpation and recolonization or range retraction and expansion?

Publications Posted on: May 06, 2014
Wolverines were greatly reduced in number and possibly extirpated from the contiguous United States (U.S.) by the early 1900s. Wolverines currently occupy much of their historical range in Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, but are absent from Utah and only single individuals are known to occur in California and Colorado. In response, the translocation of wolverines to California and Colorado is being considered.