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Keyword: habitat types

Home: A Guide to Soil Quality Monitoring for Long Term Ecosystem Sustainability on Northern Region National Forests

Pages Posted on: November 28, 2016
SoLo is a computerized and networked collection of representative documentation on Soil quality monitoring and Long term ecosystem sustainability, linked electronically by topic and by geography. Use the Menu to the left to begin a search, and follow the links to find the information you need.

SoLo Research Publications

Pages Posted on: November 25, 2016
Information by Map Units Ecological Subsections Landtype Associations Habitat Types  Region 1 National Forests

Habitat selection by Mexican Spotted Owls in Northern Arizona

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We compared use of seven habitat types to availability of those types within the home ranges of eight radio-tagged Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida). When all habitat types were considered simultaneously, habitat use differed from habitat availability for each owl. Patterns of habitat use varied among individuals and with respect to activity.

The vegetation of the Grand River/Cedar River, Sioux, and Ashland Districts of the Custer National Forest: a habitat type classification.

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
A vegetation classification was developed, using the methods and concepts of Daubenmire, on the Ashland, Sioux, and Grand River/Cedar River Districts of the Custer National Forest. Of the 26 habitat types delimited and described, eight were steppe, nine shrub-steppe, four woodland, and five forest. Two community types also were described.

The habitat types

Publications Posted on: August 14, 2015
Nearly everywhere in eastern Washington and northern Idaho as one leaves the steppe at the foot of the mountains and enters the forest, the first coniferous tree encountered is Pinus ponderosa. The ability of this species to endure dry climates· well exceeds that of our next most drouth-tolerant conifer, Pseudotsuga menziesii. Therefore, typically a belt of climax pine forest separates steppe from Pseudotsuga forest.

Forest habitat types of Montana

Publications Posted on: July 30, 2012
A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the forests of Montana. It is based on an intensive 4-year study and reconnaissance sampling of about 1,500 stands. A hierarchical classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. A total of 9 climax series, 64 habitat types, and 37 additional phases of habitat types are defined.

Forest habitat types of central Idaho

Publications Posted on: February 14, 2012
A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the forests of central Idaho. It is based on reconnaissance sampling of about 800 stands. A hierarchical taxonomic classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. A total of eight climax series, 64 habitat types, and 55 additional phases of habitat types are defined and described.

Pinyon-juniper woodlands in Zion National Park, Utah

Publications Posted on: November 14, 2011
Juniperus osteosperma-Pinus monophylla or P. edulis (P-J) woodlands are the most widespread plant community in Zion National Park (ZNP), southwestern Utah. These woodlands dominate nearly half of the park's land area. Our study of this vegetational complex is based on a sample consisting of 115 macroplots (each 0.01 ha in area) objectively distributed across the entire area of ZNP.

Height-age relationships for regeneration-size trees in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA

Publications Posted on: October 19, 2010
Regression equations were developed to predict heights of 10 conifer species inregenerating stands in central and northern Idaho, western Montana, and eastern Washington. Most sample trees were natural regeneration that became established after conventional harvest and site preparation methods.

Coniferous forest habitat types of central and southern Utah

Publications Posted on: February 02, 2010
A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the coniferous forests of central and southern Utah. It is based on reconnaissance sampling of about 720 stands. A hierarchical taxonomic classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. Seven climax series, 37 habitat types, and six additional phases of habitat types are defined and described.

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