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Keyword: Great Basin

Water and water use in southern Nevada [Chapter 3]

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Water and water use in southern Nevada is an important issue. The scarcity of water resources for both human and biologic communities often leads to intense competition for both surface and groundwaters. Anthropogenic and climate change impacts on scarce water resources need to be understood to assess human and ecosystem health for the study area.

Southern Nevada ecosystem stressors [Chapter 2]

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada ecosystems and their associated resources are subject to a number of global and regional/local stressors that are affecting the sustainability of the region. Global stressors include elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and associated changes in temperature and precipitation patterns and amounts, solar radiation, and nutrient cycles (Smith and others 2009b).

An overview of the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis [Chapter 1]

Publications Posted on: September 09, 2013
Southern Nevada is characterized by an arid to semi-arid environment with numerous cultural resources and a high level of biological diversity. Since 1980, the human population of the region has increased at unprecedented rates largely due to the expansion of suburban areas (Hughson 2009).

The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada - Executive Summary

Publications Posted on: July 29, 2013
This synthesis provides information related to the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership (SNAP) Science and Research Strategy Goal 1 - to restore, sustain and enhance southern Nevada’s ecosystems - and Goal 2 - to provide for responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands in a manner that preserves heritage resources and promotes an understanding of human interaction with the landscape.

The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada

Publications Posted on: July 26, 2013
This synthesis provides information related to the Southern Nevada Agency Partnership (SNAP) Science and Research Strategy Goal 1 - to restore, sustain and enhance southern Nevada’s ecosystems - and Goal 2 - to provide for responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands in a manner that preserves heritage resources and promotes an understanding of human interaction with the landscape.

Is Pyrenophora semeniperda the cause of downy brome (Bromus tectorum) die-offs?

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2013
Downy brome (cheatgrass) is a highly successful, exotic, winter annual invader in semi-arid western North America, forming near-monocultures across many landscapes. A frequent but poorly understood phenomenon in these heavily invaded areas is periodic 'die-off' or complete stand failure. The fungal pathogen Pyrenophora semeniperda is abundant in cheatgrass seed banks and causes high mortality.

Restoration potentials and challenges for Sphaeralcea munroana

Publications Posted on: February 05, 2013
Munro’s globemallow (Sphaeralcea munroana [Douglas] Spach) is an herbaceous perennial and an important candidate for use in restoration due to its ecological significance and environmental resilience. The species’ popularity among growers and land managers has recently increased but there is still a lack of information regarding seed dormancy and early seedling physiology, making the effective use of the species difficult.

Demographic processes limiting seedling recruitment in arid grassland restoration

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2012
Seeding is an important management tool in aridland restoration, but seeded species often fail to establish. Previous research has largely focused on the technical aspects of seeding with little effort directed at identifying demographic processes driving recruitment failures.

Managing soil nitrogen to restore annual grass-infested plant communities: Effective strategy or incomplete framework?

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2012
Theoretical and empirical work has established a positive relationship between resource availability and habitat invasibility. For nonnative invasive annual grasses, similar to other invasive species, invader success has been tied most often to increased nitrogen (N) availability. These observations have led to the logical assumption that managing soils for low N availability will facilitate restoration of invasive plant-dominated systems.

A collaborative program to provide native plant materials for the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2012
The Great Basin as defined on a floristic basis includes the hydrographic Great Basin plus the Owyhee Uplands and Snake River Plain of southern Idaho (Fig. 1). The region encompasses about 60 million ha, of which more than two-thirds are publicly owned. Vegetation ranges from salt desert and sagebrush shrublands in the basins to conifer forests in the more than 200 mountain ranges.

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