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Keyword: Great Basin

Post-fire vegetation response at the woodland-shrubland interface is mediated by the pre-fire community

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
Understanding the drivers of ecosystem responses to disturbance is essential for management aimed at maintaining or restoring ecosystem processes and services, especially where invasive species respond strongly to disturbance.

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Media Gallery Posted on: May 11, 2017
Native plant community restoration is a vital tool for preserving and maintaining diverse ecosystems that support wildlife and provide ecosystem functions essential to healthy human communities. The success of restoration projects depends on using plant materials that are adapted to local environmental and climatic conditions. Seed transfer guidelines and seed zones help land managers in selecting the right seed for the right place. To learn more about this see Science Spotlight: The Right Seed At The Right Place

The Right Seed At The Right Place

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 11, 2017
Native plant community restoration is a vital tool for preserving and maintaining diverse ecosystems that support wildlife and provide ecosystem functions essential to healthy human communities. The success of restoration projects depends on using plant materials that are adapted to local environmental and climatic conditions. Seed transfer guidelines and seed zones help land managers in selecting the right seed for the right place.

Great Basin Factsheet Series 2016 - Information and tools to restore and conserve Great Basin ecosystems

Publications Posted on: November 17, 2016
Land managers are responsible for developing effective strategies for conserving and restoring Great Basin ecosystems in the face of invasive species, conifer expansion, and altered fire regimes. A warming climate is magnifying the effects of these threats and adding urgency to implementation of management practices that will maintain or improve ecosystem functioning.

Historic fire regime forensics: Deciphering drivers and variability from tree rings

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 18, 2016
Proper management of naturally forested landscapes requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns in which key disturbance processes are manifest and their effects on species composition and structure. Linked fire and forest histories constructed from tree-ring evidence provide valuable information about drivers of fire occurrence and about the variability and interactions of fire regimes and vegetation on heterogeneous landscapes.

Surface fuel characteristics, temporal dynamics, and fire behavior of masticated mixed-conifer fuelbeds in the western U.S.

Projects Posted on: August 18, 2016
For the past three years, scientists from the RMRS Fire Sciences Lab in Missoula and the Forestry Sciences Lab in Moscow have been researching mastication as a fuel treatment in the Rocky Mountains. Specifically, they have been interested in how the materials age when they are left on the ground to decompose and how that aging affects their flammability.

Quantifying the combined effects of climate, fire, and treatments on the connectivity and fragmentation of wildlife populations across the Great Basin

Projects Posted on: August 17, 2016
Over one million acres will receive treatments across the Great Basin Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GBLCC) to conserve greater sage-grouse habitat over the next decade. These treatments are intended to restore native sagebrush habitat by reducing encroachment of juniper, infestations of invasive weeds, and wildfire. This project will evaluate the effects of vegetation treatments on population connectivity, genetic diversity and gene flow of wildlife species across the full extent of the Great Basin Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

Pinyon jays: Orchardists of the Great Basin’s woodlands

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 01, 2016
Over the past century, many pinyon-juniper woodlands in the Great Basin have expanded their range and increased their stand densities. These changes in structure and extent have effects on both the species that use the woodlands and to species whose habitat is being encroached by them. We observed and described where pinyon jays prefer to cache seeds in order to gain an understanding on how and where expansion and infill is likely to occur and to what extent jays are facilitating these processes.

Rush skeletonweed (Chondrilla juncea L.) in the northern Great Basin - Research Summary

Documents and Media Posted on: May 25, 2016
Rush skeletonweed, an exotic herbaceous member of the sunflower family, has spread rapidly from its first known occurrence near Spokane, Washington and now occurs on 2.5 million acres in the Western U.S. Recent research has focused on development of more effective biocontrols, its response to fire in the sagebrush ecosystem and its potential for spread in the Great Basin. Document Type: White Papers

Do container volume, site preparation, and field fertilization affect restoration potential of Wyoming big sagebrush?

Publications Posted on: April 21, 2016
Land management practices, invasive species expansion, and changes in the fire regime greatly impact the distribution of native plants in natural areas. Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis), a keystone species in the Great Basin, has seen a 50% reduction in its distribution.

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