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Keyword: Great Basin

Energy development in the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: January 18, 2008
The United States, with less than 5 percent of the world’s population, consumes 40 percent of the oil and 23 percent of natural gas annual global production. Fluctuating and rising energy prices can be expected to continue with political instability in producing countries and intensifying supply competition from expanding Asian economies.

Public perceptions of land management in the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: January 18, 2008
The Great Basin is undergoing significant landscape change due to an array of natural and anthropogenic factors. Land management strategies intended to address these problems will require landscape-scale solutions that can reduce, reverse, or mitigate ecosystem degradation while remaining economically feasible and socially acceptable.

Urbanization and changing land use in the Great Basin

Publications Posted on: January 18, 2008
The Great Basin is defined for this issue paper as the 61.5 million ha (152 million acres) of land within 121 Level 6 Hydrologic Units ringed by Salt Lake City to the east, Boise to the north, Reno to the west, and to the south, Las Vegas, which is outside the study boundary.

Introduction

Publications Posted on: January 18, 2008
The Great Basin is considered to be one of the most endangered ecoregions in the United States (Noss and others 1995, Wisdom and others 2005). The population is expanding at the highest rate in the nation, and major sociological and ecological changes are occurring across the region.

Collaborative management and research in the Great Basin - examining the issues and developing a framework for action

Publications Posted on: January 18, 2008
The Great Basin is one of the most imperiled regions in the United States. Sustaining its ecosystems, resources, and human populations requires strong collaborative partnerships among the region's research and management organizations. This GTR is the product of a workshop on "Collaborative Watershed Research and Management in the Great Basin" held in Reno, Nevada, November 28 through 30, 2006.

Prediction of cheatgrass field germination potential using wet thermal accumulation

Publications Posted on: December 18, 2007
Invasion and dominance of weedy species is facilitated or constrained by environmental and ecological factors that affect resource availability during critical life stages. We compared the relative effects of season, annual weather, site, and disturbance on potential cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) germination in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) communities.

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