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Keyword: grazing

100 years of vegetation change at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
This project incorporates historical data collected at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest nearly 100 years ago to determine how plant communities have changed over that period of time.

Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest Vegetation Mapping Project

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
The Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest (SAEF) Vegetation Mapping Project uses unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to create highly detailed vegetation maps using Structure From Motion technology.  These maps are then used to overlay historical vegetation maps made nearly 100 years ago to determine how vegetation has changed over the last century.

Activities Monitored

Pages Posted on: October 17, 2018
Fire Grazing Harvest Roading Site Preparation  

First-year postfire and postharvest soil temperatures in aspen and conifer stands

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) stands are in decline throughout the Interior Western United States because of fire suppression, overbrowsing by domestic livestock and native ungulates, and forest succession.

Effects and interactions of fire, logging, and grazing

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
In this chapter, we summarize current knowledge about the effects of fire, logging, and grazing on coniferous forest birds and their habitats. We critically review the results of studies evaluating how these individual factors influence bird numbers, species diversity, nesting success, and habitat use in ponderosa pine forests.

Patterns and dynamics of vegetation recovery following grazing cessation in the California golden trout habitat

Publications Posted on: August 24, 2017
In 1978, the Golden Trout Wilderness area was established to protect the California golden trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita)—a vulnerable subspecies of the rainbow trout that is endemic to California—and its habitat, which is currently restricted to a few streams within high-elevation meadows in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range.

Vulnerability of grazing and confined livestock in the Northern Great Plains to projected mid- and late-twenty-first century climate

Publications Posted on: August 03, 2017
The Northern Great Plains (NGP) region of the USA - which comprises Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska - is a largely rural area that provides numerous ecosystem services, including livestock products, cultural services, and conservation of biological diversity.

GSD Update: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2016 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
In this issue of the GSD Update, we take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted. We feature program research that lines up with the strategic priorities of the USDA Forest Service and the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS).

Region 4 Science Partner Program: Adapting rangeland monitoring strategies

Projects Posted on: July 10, 2017
There is a growing need for cost-effective tools that enable researchers to efficiently monitor and evaluate rangeland systems. RMRS researchers are partnering with the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest to enhance existing monitoring and modeling strategies, which assess rangeland conditions. This project will expand the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) user base, develop remote monitors, and build collaborative relationships inside and outside of the National Forest System.

Don’t bust the biological soil crust: Preserving and restoring an important desert resource

Publications Posted on: February 23, 2017
Biological soil crusts are a complex of microscopic organisms growing on the soil surface in many arid and semi-arid ecosystems. These crusts perform the important role of stabilizing soil and reducing or eliminating water and wind erosion. One of the largest threats to biological soil crusts in the arid and semi-arid areas of the western United States is mechanical disturbance from vehicle traffic and grazing.

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