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Keyword: gradient modeling

Integrating ecosystem sampling, gradient modeling, remote sensing, and ecosystem simulation to create spatially explicit landscape inventories

Publications Posted on: July 11, 2019
Presented is a prototype of the Landscape Ecosystem Inventory System (LEIS), a system for creating maps of important landscape characteristics for natural resource planning. This system uses gradient-based field inventories coupled with gradient modeling remote sensing, ecosystem simulation, and statistical analyses to derive spatial data layers required for ecosystem management.

Multi-scale habitat relationships of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) in the mixed conifer landscape of the Northern Rockies, USA: Cross-scale effects of horizontal cover with implications for forest management

Publications Posted on: January 10, 2017
Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) are an ecologically important herbivore because they modify vegetation through browsing and serve as a prey resource for multiple predators. We implemented a multiscale approach to characterize habitat relationships for snowshoe hares across the mixed conifer landscape of the northern Rocky Mountains, USA.

Evaluating ASTER satellite imagery and gradient modeling for mapping and characterizing wildland fire fuels

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2007
Land managers need cost-effective methods for mapping and characterizing fire fuels quickly and accurately. The advent of sensors with increased spatial resolution may improve the accuracy and reduce the cost of fuels mapping.

Characterizing and mapping forest fire fuels using ASTER imagery and gradient modeling

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2006
Land managers need cost-effective methods for mapping and characterizing forest fuels quickly and accurately. The launch of satellite sensors with increased spatial resolution may improve the accuracy and reduce the cost of fuels mapping.

Evaluating the ASTER sensor for mapping and characterizing forest fire fuels in northern Idaho

Publications Posted on: April 07, 2006
Land managers need cost-effective methods for mapping and characterizing fire fuels quickly and accurately. The advent of sensors with increased spatial resolution may improve the accuracy and reduce the cost of fuels mapping.