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Keyword: fuels

Synthesis of knowledge of extreme fire behavior: volume 2 for fire behavior specialists, researchers, and meteorologists

Publications Posted on: March 15, 2016
The National Wildfire Coordinating Group’s definition of extreme fire behavior indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning/ spotting, presence of fire whirls, and strong convection column.

The RxCADRE study: A new approach to interdisciplinary fire research

Publications Posted on: February 09, 2016
Much like other scientific endeavours, most fire research is conducted either within individual disciplines - fuels, physics, chemistry, ecology, modelling, and so forth - or, at best, across only two or three disciplines. This is primarily because fire scientists have particular areas of expertise and most collaborations are between scientists within that expertise.

Mastication effects on fuels, plants, and soils in four western U.S. ecosystems

Documents and Media Posted on: January 29, 2016
This project compared fuel reduction mulching and adjacent untreated stands at conifer ecosystems distributed across Colorado and evaluated the effects of mulch depth both experimentally and in operational units. Results from this study provide land managers and researchers greater understanding of the lasting effects of mulching on community and ecosystem processes. Document Type: Other Documents

Wildfire Hazard Potential (WHP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2014 classified

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
Federal wildfire managers often want to know, over large landscapes, where wildfires are likely to occur and how intense they may be. To meet this need we developed a map that we call wildfire hazard potential (WHP) – a raster geospatial product that can help to inform evaluations of wildfire risk or prioritization of fuels management needs across very large spatial scales (millions of acres).

Wildfire Hazard Potential (WHP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2014 continuous

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
Federal wildfire managers often want to know, over large landscapes, where wildfires are likely to occur and how intense they may be. To meet this need we developed a map that we call wildfire hazard potential (WHP) – a raster geospatial product that can help to inform evaluations of wildfire risk or prioritization of fuels management needs across very large spatial scales (millions of acres).

Wildland Fire Potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2012 continuous

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
The wildland fire potential (WFP) map is a raster geospatial product produced by the USDA Forest Service, Fire Modeling Institute that is intended to be used in analyses of wildfire risk or hazardous fuels prioritization at large landscapes (100s of square miles) up through regional or national scales.

Wildland Fire Potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2012 classified

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
The wildland fire potential (WFP) map is a raster geospatial product produced by the USDA Forest Service, Fire Modeling Institute that is intended to be used in analyses of wildfire risk or hazardous fuels prioritization at large landscapes (100s of square miles) up through regional or national scales.

Relationship of fuel size and spacing to combustion characteristics of laboratory fuel cribs

Publications Posted on: October 22, 2015
Flaming combustion in cribs of large woody fuels, thickness 5 cm or greater, is not sustained when fuel spacing ratio, fuel edge-to-edge separation distance to fuel thickness, is greater than 3:1. The flame length associated with the large-fuel burning rate was found to drop rapidly when the large-fuel spacing ratio increases beyond 2.23:1.

Dynamics of coarse woody debris in southwestern mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

Projects Posted on: October 09, 2015
Snags (standing dead trees) and logs are important components of forest landscapes. RMRS scientists established a series of fixed plots in 1997 for monitoring snag populations. This research has direct ramifications for 11 national forests throughout the Southwestern Region, as well as for our overall understanding of the ecology of coarse woody debris and effects of climate change on forest structure and composition.

How to measure, describe, and map wildland fuels

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 30, 2015
Researchers with the Rocky Mountain Research Station investigated a number of fuel characteristics across major surface and canopy fuel components that comprise northern Rocky Mountain forest and range fuelbeds. They found that most fuel components have high variability that increases with fuel particle size.

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