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Keyword: fuels

An update of the National Fire Danger Rating System

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2018
The National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is a system that allows fire managers to estimate today's or tomorrow's fire danger for a given area. In 2014, RMRS fire danger rating system developers sought and gained approval to update the U.S. National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS).

Lubrecht Fire-Fire Surrogate Study

Projects Posted on: April 10, 2018
Fuel treatment impacts in ponderosa pine - Douglas-fir forests in the Northern Rockies.

Weather, fuels, fire behavior, plumes, and smoke - the nexus of fire meteorology

Publications Posted on: September 22, 2017
In a pair of review papers, Potter (2012a, 2012b) summarized the significant fire weather research findings over about the past hundred years.

The influence of fuelbed properties on moisture drying rates and timelags of longleaf pine litter

Publications Posted on: July 25, 2017
Fire managers often model pine needles as 1 h timelag fuels, but fuelbed properties may significantly change the rate at which needles exchange moisture with the atmosphere. The problem of determining whether moisture loss from fine fuels is being controlled by individual particles or by the fuelbed remains unresolved.

2016 High Park fire science workshop

Projects Posted on: May 17, 2017
A workshop was hosted by the Coalition for the Poudre River Watershed for those interested in wildfires and post-fire ecology and impacts, discussing transmission of key research findings from work done in the High Park Fire on key topics, implications for post fire restoration management decision making and identification of barriers to rehab/restoration action & knowledge gaps. Researchers from Rocky Mountain Research Station, CSU, and other regional institutions presented results from their work since the High Park Fire.

The Rangeland Vegetation Simulator: A user-driven system for quantifying production, succession, disturbance and fuels in non-forest environments

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Rangeland landscapes occupy roughly 662 million acres in the coterminous U.S. (Reeves and Mitchell 2011) and their vegetation responds quickly to climate and management, with high relative growth rates and inter-annual variability. Current national decision support systems in the U.S.

Canopy-derived fuels drive patterns of in-fire energy release and understory plant mortality in a longleaf pine ( Pinus palustris ) sandhill in northwest Florida, USA

Publications Posted on: September 14, 2016
Wildland fire radiant energy emission is one of the only measurements of combustion that can be made at high temporal and spatial resolutions. Furthermore, spatially and temporally explicit measurements are critical for making inferences about ecological fire effects.

A prototype application of state and transition simulation modeling in support of grassland management

Publications Posted on: August 10, 2016
The Great Plains grasslands of North America provide a multitude of ecosystem services including clean water, forage, habitat, recreation, and pollination of native and agricultural plants. A general lack of quantitative information regarding the effects of varied management strategies on these spatially heterogeneous landscapes complicates our understanding of the processes within them.

Data for National Fire and Fire Surrogate study: environmental effects of alternative fuel reduction treatments

Datasets Posted on: June 08, 2016
Comprised of 12 sites nationwide, the Fire and Fire Surrogates study (FFS) is a comprehensive interdisciplinary experiment designed to evaluate the economics and ecological consequences of alternative fuel reduction treatments in seasonally dry forests of the United States.

Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on flora

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
VOLUME 2: This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on flora and fuels can assist land managers with ecosystem and fire management planning and in their efforts to inform others about the ecological role of fire.

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