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Keyword: fuel treatment

Mechanized fuel treatment effects on soil compaction in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer stands

Documents and Media Posted on: October 03, 2018
The immediate need to treat forest fuels is often justified as a need to reduce potential fire behavior as well as improve or maintain forest health. Millions of hectares are at risk of unusually severe fires in the United States, and fuel treatments are being prescribed at unprecedented scales. In many cases, mechanical treatments with heavy equipment are the most efficient or economical method to reduce fuels.Document Type: Other Documents

Fire regimes approaching historic norms reduce wildfire-facilitated conversion from forest to non-forest

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Extensive high-severity wildfires have driven major losses of ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests in the southwestern United States, in some settings catalyzing enduring conversions to nonforested vegetation types. Management interventions to reduce the probability of stand-replacing wildfire have included mechanical fuel treatments, prescribed fire, and wildfire managed for resource benefit.

Fire and fuel treatments increase tree resistance to bark beetles

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 10, 2018
The frequency of fire in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density, increased the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. This study investigated how low-intensity fire affects tree defenses and whether fuel treatments impact resistance to a mountain pine beetle outbreak.

Physical and chemical characteristics of surface fuels in masticated mixed-conifer stands of the U.S. Rocky Mountains

Publications Posted on: January 31, 2018
Mastication is a wildland fuel treatment technique that is rapidly becoming the preferred method for many fire hazard reduction projects, especially in areas where reducing fuels with prescribed fire is particularly challenging.

Research and Development wildland fire and fuels accomplishments and outcomes

Publications Posted on: June 08, 2017
The Research and Development (R&D) Wildland Fire and Fuels program at the Forest Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, continues to be an internationally renowned program for generating critical and essential data, knowledge, and applications for all phases of wildland fire management and response.

Modeling fuels and fire effects in 3D: Model description and applications

Publications Posted on: January 31, 2017
Scientists and managers critically need ways to assess how fuel treatments alter fire behavior, yet few tools currently exist for this purpose.We present a spatially-explicit-fuel-modeling system, FuelManager, which models fuels, vegetation growth, fire behavior (using a physics-based model, FIRETEC), and fire effects. FuelManager's flexible approach facilitates modeling fuels across a wide range of detail.

Fortifying the forest: Thinning and burning increase resistance to a bark beetle outbreak and promote forest resilience

Publications Posted on: September 30, 2016
Fire frequency in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density and the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire.

Fire, fuel treatments, and ecological restoration: Conference proceedings; 2002 16-18 April; Fort Collins, CO

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Recent fires have spawned intense interest in fuel treatment and ecological restoration activities. Scientists and land managers have been advocating these activities for years, and the recent fires have provided incentives for federal, state, and local entities to move ahead with ambitious hazard reduction and restoration projects. Recent fires also have increased public awareness about the risks and hazards of living in wild areas.

Wildland fire as a self-regulating mechanism: The role of previous burns and weather in limiting fire progression

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Theory suggests that natural fire regimes can result in landscapes that are both self-regulating and resilient to fire. For example, because fires consume fuel, they may create barriers to the spread of future fires, thereby regulating fire size. Top-down controls such as weather, however, can weaken this effect.

Interactions of fuel treatments, wildfire severity, and carbon dynamics in dry conifer forests

Publications Posted on: August 21, 2015
Wildfires have been increasing in size and severity over recent decades. Forest managers use fuel treatments, including tree thinning and prescribed burning, to reduce the risk of high-severity fire. The impact of fuel treatments on carbon dynamics is not fully understood; previous research indicates that because carbon is removed during fuel treatments, the net effect may not be a reduction of carbon lost in the case of wildfire.

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