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Keyword: forests

Survey responses from Region 9: Are we achieving the public's objectives for forests and rangelands?

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The survey on values, objectives, beliefs, and attitudes, implemented as a module of the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment, asked over 7,000 respondents nationwide about their values with respect to public lands, objectives for the management of these lands, beliefs about the role the USDA Forest Service should play in fulfilling those objectives, and attitudes about the job the agency has been doing.

Survey responses from Region 8: Are we achieving the public's objectives for forests and rangelands?

Publications Posted on: August 01, 2018
The survey on values, objectives, beliefs, and attitudes, implemented as a module of the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment, asked over 7,000 respondents nationwide about their values with respect to public lands, objectives for the management of these lands, beliefs about the role the USDA Forest Service should play in fulfilling those objectives, and attitudes about the job the agency has been doing.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern United States?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Dry conifer forests in the Western United States historically had low impact surface fires approximately every five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser, and therefore have a greater probability of experiencing intense fires that burn entire stands and convert forests to non-forest landscapes. What environmental conditions are necessary to promote low-severity fire in dry conifer forests? Causes and consequences of high-severity fires are increasingly being studied but little to no research has focused on factors that promote low-severity fires, until now.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern USA?

Publications Posted on: April 23, 2018
Many dry conifer forests in the southwestern USA and elsewhere historically (prior to the late 1800’s) experienced fairly frequent surface fire at intervals ranging from roughly five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser and more homogenous, and therefore they have a greater probability of experiencing stand-replacing fire compared to prior centuries.

Interactions of landscape disturbances and climate change dictate ecological pattern and process: spatial modeling of wildfire, insect, and disease dynamics under future climates

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2017
Context: Interactions among disturbances, climate, and vegetation influence landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. Climate changes, exotic invasions, beetle outbreaks, altered fire regimes, and human activities may interact to produce landscapes that appear and function beyond historical analogs.

Climate change vulnerability assessment of forests in the Southwest USA

Publications Posted on: July 19, 2017
Climate change effects are already apparent in some Southwestern US forests and are expected to intensify in the coming decades, via direct (temperature, precipitation) and indirect (fire, pests, pathogens) stressors.

Old-growth forests in the Southwest and Rocky Mountain Regions - Proceedings of a workshop

Publications Posted on: December 09, 2016
This paper reviews the science and management of old-growth forests and summarizes discussions among 30 participants at a workshop in Portal, Arizona, March 9-13, 1992. Concepts of old-growth forests - the perceptions, values, definitions, characteristic features, ecological functions, and landscape importance - vary widely.

Fire history and moisture influences on historical forest age structure in the sky islands of southern Arizona, USA

Publications Posted on: November 18, 2016
Aim: The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of moisture and fire on historical ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) age structure patterns. Location: We used a natural experiment created over time by the unique desert island geography of southern Arizona. Methods: We sampled tree establishment dates in two sites on Rincon Peak and another site in the Santa Catalina Mountains.

Multi-model comparison on the effects of climate change on tree species in the eastern U.S.: results from an enhanced niche model and process-based ecosystem and landscape models

Publications Posted on: June 27, 2016
Context. Species distribution models (SDM) establish statistical relationships between the current distribution of species and key attributes whereas process-based models simulate ecosystem and tree species dynamics based on representations of physical and biological processes.

Fine-scale variability of forest soil fungal communities in two contrasting habitat series in northern Idaho, USA identified with microbial metagenomics

Publications Posted on: June 21, 2016
Forests are home to some of the most complex microbial communities (Fierer et al. 2012) which drive biogeochemical cycles (Clemmensen et al. 2013; van der Heijden et al. 2008) and account for substantial terrestrial biomass (Nielsen et al. 2011). Fungi, through their ecological roles as decomposers, mutualists, or pathogens, are particularly important in breaking down organic matter and mediating plant nutrition.

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