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Keyword: Forest Pathology

Root disease can rival fire and harvest in reducing forest carbon storage

Publications Posted on: September 27, 2017
Root diseases are known to suppress forest regeneration and reduce growth rates, and they may become more common as susceptible tree species become maladapted in parts of their historic ranges due to climate change.

Diseases of trees in the Great Plains

Publications Posted on: October 07, 2016
Hosts, distribution, symptoms and signs, disease cycle, and management strategies are described for 84 hardwood and 32 conifer diseases in 56 chapters. Color illustrations are provided to aid in accurate diagnosis. A glossary of technical terms and indexes to hosts and pathogens also are included.

Next logical steps in forest pathology activities for Guam, Saipan, Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, and Kosrae [Chapter X]

Publications Posted on: June 23, 2016
As a result of the forest pathology trip that occurred during September of 2013, advances were made on several important fronts, and future activities were also identified as critical for addressing threats to forest health in Micronesia. The purpose of this chapter is to list and briefly describe each of these activities.

Phellinus noxius in Guam, Saipan, Yap, Palau, Pohnpei and Kosrae [Chapter IV]

Publications Posted on: June 23, 2016
Phellinus noxius has a reputation of being an aggressive root rot pathogen on many forest tree species in parts of Southeast Asia and its symptoms and signs have been well documented. Previous reports from Micronesia indicated that this fungal pathogen is responsible for considerable damage in Saipan and likely present in Kosrae and Pohnpei.

Characterizing forest root‐ and butt‐rot fungi in Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Guam and Saipan [Chapter III]

Publications Posted on: June 23, 2016
Ganoderma and Phellinus are two common fungal genera causing butt-rot on trees growing on USA-affiliated islands of the western Pacific. Although these fungi can be quite prevalent, especially in some older mangrove stands, it appears that the majority of infections caused by these fungi leads to severe rotting of the heartwood but do not kill the living tissues of the sapwood, cambium and phloem.

The causes of mangrove death on Yap, Palau, Pohnpei and Kosrae [Chapter II]

Publications Posted on: June 23, 2016
The area of a massive mangrove dieback in Yinuf Mn Island, Yap, was selected as the first location to study mangrove dieback problems. Seawater and soil samples were collected from plots where the mangrove trees were dead/dying and these samples were analyzed for eight different seawater and soil floor properties.

Forest pathology in Yap, Palau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Guam and Saipan, Sept. 2013

Publications Posted on: June 23, 2016
In September of 2013, an opportunity was seized by the Regional Forest Pathologist to do some work on the following islands in Micronesia and the Marianas: Yap, Palau, Guam, Saipan, Pohnpei, and Kosrae. The principle justification for doing the work at this time was that satellite images showed large areas of dead mangroves on Yap (Liu, pers. com). Many parties wanted to know the cause of this extensive dieback.

Data for National Fire and Fire Surrogate study: environmental effects of alternative fuel reduction treatments

Datasets Posted on: June 08, 2016
Comprised of 12 sites nationwide, the Fire and Fire Surrogates study (FFS) is a comprehensive interdisciplinary experiment designed to evaluate the economics and ecological consequences of alternative fuel reduction treatments in seasonally dry forests of the United States.

Mistletoes of North American conifers

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Mistletoes of the families Loranthaceae and Viscaceae are the most important vascular plant parasites of conifers in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Species of the genera Psittacanthus, Phoradendron, and Arceuthobium cause the greatest economic and ecological impacts. These shrubby, aerial parasites produce either showy or cryptic flowers; they are dispersed by birds or explosive fruits.

Diseases of trees in the Great Plains

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
Hosts, distribution, symptoms and signs, disease cycle, and control measures are described for 46 hardwood and 15 conifer diseases. Diseases in which abiotic agents are contributory factors also are described. Color and black-and-white illustrations that stress diagnosis and control are provided. A glossary of technical terms and indexes to hosts, pathogens, and insect vectors also are included.

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