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Keyword: fire

How do wildfires and forest restoration efforts affect spotted owls?

Science Spotlights Posted on: February 06, 2018
High-severity wildfires are increasing and researchers are issuing different findings regarding wildfire impacts on spotted owls (Strix occidentalis), a threatened species that nests in mature, western forests with large trees and high canopy cover. Data from different studies show mixed responses of spotted owls to fire, but suggest that the effects of high-severity wildfires could be significant throughout the range of all three subspecies. The debate over owls, wildfire, and managed forest restoration needs further evaluation.

Tree demography records and last recorded fire dates from the Pinaleño Demography Project, Arizona USA

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2017
Enter summary (recommended) or leave this area entirely blank (delete this content) Text in the summary field displays in listings and provides more information to people browsing the site. Text in the summary field does not appear in the body of the page. Document Type: Other Documents

A framework for evaluating forest restoration alternatives and their outcomes, over time, to inform monitoring: Bioregional inventory originated simulation under management

Publications Posted on: October 04, 2017
The BioSum modeling framework summarizes current and prospective future forest conditions under alternative management regimes along with their costs, revenues and product yields.

Climate change and wildfire effects in aridland riparian ecosystems

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 24, 2017
A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The structurally diverse, species-rich vegetation along many southwestern streams supports high densities of territories and nest sites for a variety of birds including several species of high conservation priority.A frequently discussed function of aridland riparian ecosystems is the contribution of woody riparian plants to breeding bird habitat. The structurally diverse, species-rich vegetation along many southwestern streams supports high densities of territories and nest sites for a variety of birds including several species of high conservation priority.

Observations and analysis of organic aerosol evolution in some prescribed fire smoke plumes

Publications Posted on: July 20, 2017
Open biomass burning is a significant source of primary air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and non-methane organic gases (NMOG). However, the physical and chemical atmospheric processing of these emissions during transport is poorly understood.

2016 High Park fire science workshop

Projects Posted on: May 17, 2017
A workshop was hosted by the Coalition for the Poudre River Watershed for those interested in wildfires and post-fire ecology and impacts, discussing transmission of key research findings from work done in the High Park Fire on key topics, implications for post fire restoration management decision making and identification of barriers to rehab/restoration action & knowledge gaps. Researchers from Rocky Mountain Research Station, CSU, and other regional institutions presented results from their work since the High Park Fire.

The most comprehensive inventory of Colorado’s forests – ever!

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 20, 2017
The current inventory of Colorado’s forest is the first to use the complete set of Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots across all ownerships and forest types. The inventory was completed at a time when Colorado forests were undergoing substantial change, primarily in the form of insect infestations in pine and spruce, but also because of drought. This report captures the current status and recent trends.  

The most comprehensive inventory of Colorado’s forests – ever!

Media Gallery Posted on: April 20, 2017
The results are in from Forest Inventory Analysis data collected from 2002 to 2014, reporting on growth, mortality, and many other forest characteristics.

Stream water quality concerns linger long after the smoke clears - learning from Front Range wildfires

Documents and Media Posted on: April 07, 2017
Large, high-severity wildfires alter the ecological processes that determine how watersheds retain and release nutrients and affect stream water quality. These changes usually abate a few years after a fire, but recent studies indicate they may persist longer than previously expected. Wildfires are a natural disturbance agent, but due to the increased frequency and extent of high-severity wildfires predicted for western North America, it is important to better understand their consequences on surface water. Document Type: Other Documents

Stream water quality after a fire

Projects Posted on: April 07, 2017
Wildland fires in the arid west create a cause for concern for many inhabitants and an area of interest for researchers. Wildfires dramatically change watersheds, yielding floods and debris flows that endanger water supplies, human lives, and valuable fish habitats.

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