You are here

Keyword: fire scar

Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine twenty-one years after removing partial cross-sections

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Concern over the effects of removing fire-scarred partial cross-sections may limit sampling of live ponderosa pine to reconstruct fire history. We report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees 20 to 21 years after removing fire-scarred partial cross-sections to reconstruct fire history.

The making of a scar: How fire scars develop in trees

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 12, 2016
When trees are injured they develop physical and chemical boundaries around the injury wound to resist infection. Trees also grow new wood to close over the injured place. Injuries caused by fires result in fire scars and we use the patterns of scarring among many trees to understand when and how often fires burn.  This research helps to understand the biological process of fire scar formation and use it to improve fire history analysis.

Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine 21 years after removing partial cross-sections

Projects Posted on: July 25, 2016
Over the past 20 years, we have been monitoring mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon since we removed a fire-scarred partial cross-section from them. We suggest that sampling live, fire-scarred ponderosa pine trees remains an important and generally non-lethal method of obtaining information about historical fires that can supplement the information obtained from dead fire-scarred trees.

Resin duct size and density as ecophysiological traits in fire scars of Pseudotsuga menziesii and Larix occidentalis

Publications Posted on: October 03, 2014
Resin ducts (RDs) are features present in most conifer species as defence structures against pests and pathogens; however, little is known about RD expression in trees following fire injury.

Changes in tracheid and ray traits in fire scars of North American conifers and their ecophysiological implications

Publications Posted on: September 17, 2014
Fire scars have been widely used as proxies for the reconstruction of fire history; however, little is known about the impact of fire injury on wood anatomy. This study investigates changes in tracheid and ray traits in fire scars of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western larch (Larix occidentalis) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and discusses their ecophysiological implications for tree recovery from fire.

Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine eleven years after removing partial cross-sections

Publications Posted on: September 23, 2008
Our objective is to report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees in Oregon ten to eleven years after removing a fire-scarred partial cross-section from them, and five years after an initial survey of post-sampling mortality. We surveyed 138 live trees from which we removed fire-scarred partial crosssections in 1994/95 and 387 similarly sized, unsampled neighbor trees of the same species.