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Keyword: fire regimes

Operationalizing resilience and resistance concepts to address invasive grass-fire cycles

Publications Posted on: June 26, 2019
Plant invasions can affect fuel characteristics, fire behavior, and fire regimes resulting in invasive plant-fire cycles and alternative, self-perpetuating states that can be difficult, if not impossible, to reverse.

Influence of landscape structure, topography, and forest type on spatial variation in historical fire regimes, Central Oregon, USA

Publications Posted on: July 10, 2018
Context: In the interior Northwest, debate over restoring mixed-conifer forests after a century of fire exclusion is hampered by poor understanding of the pattern and causes of spatial variation in historical fire regimes. Objectives: To identify the roles of topography, landscape structure, and forest type in driving spatial variation in historical fire regimes in mixed-conifer forests of central Oregon.

Multidecadal trends in area burned with high severity in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area 1880-2012

Publications Posted on: December 12, 2017
Multidecadal trends in areas burned with high severity shape ecological effects of fires, but most assessments are limited to ~30 years of satellite data.

Fires, ecological effects of

Publications Posted on: January 31, 2017
Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire.

Long-term, landscape patterns of past fire events in a montane ponderosa pine forest of central Colorado

Publications Posted on: December 27, 2016
Parameters of fire regimes, including fire frequency, spatial extent of burned areas, fire severity, and season of fire occurrence, influence vegetation patterns over multiple scales. In this study, centuries-long patterns of fire events in a montane ponderosa pine - Douglas-fir forest landscape surrounding Cheesman Lake in central Colorado were reconstructed from fire-scarred trees and inferences from forest stand ages.

Managing invasive annual brome grasses and altered fire regimes

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 19, 2016
Invasive annual brome grasses are resulting in altered fire regimes and conversion of native arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the western United States to annual grass dominance. The problem is particularly acute in sagebrush shrublands where cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) has resulted in annual grass fire cycles that are placing numerous native species such as greater sage-grouse at risk and threating ecosystem services such as livestock forage, hunting and recreation, and even clean air and water. This 15-chapter book examines the environmental impacts, invasiveness, environmental controls, and management alternatives for invasive annual brome-grasses.

Avian relationships with wildfire at two dry forest locations with different historical fire regimes

Publications Posted on: May 20, 2016
Wildfire is a key factor influencing bird community composition in western North American forests. We need to understand species and community responses to wildfire and how responses vary regionally to effectively manage dry conifer forests for maintaining biodiversity. We compared avian relationships with wildfire burn severity between two dry forest locations of Arizona and Idaho.

Development of coarse-scale spatial data for wildland fire and fuel management

Publications Posted on: May 12, 2016
We produced seven coarse-scale, 1-km2 resolution, spatial data layers for the conterminous United States to support national-level fire planning and risk assessments.

Variability of fire behavior, fire effects, and emissions in Scotch pine forests of central Siberia

Publications Posted on: February 03, 2016
As part of the Russian FIRE BEAR (Fire Effects in the Boreal Eurasia Region) Project, replicated 4-ha experimental fires were conducted on a dry Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris)/lichen (Cladonia sp.)/feathermoss (Pleurozeum schreberi) forest site in central Siberia.

Celebrating 30 years of the Fire Effects Information System (FEIS)

Science Spotlights Posted on: November 10, 2015
Thirty years ago, Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist William (Bill) Fischer proposed a highly innovative computer system to provide managers with information about the effects of prescribed fire. Technology has changed radically since Fischer originally envisioned a computer program to provide fire effects information electronically. The FEIS user interface now enables readers to search using many criteria, including maps, and it connects information from all three FEIS products - Species Reviews, Fire Studies, and Fire Regimes.

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