You are here

Keyword: fire planning

Wildfire Hazard Potential (WHP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2014 classified

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
Federal wildfire managers often want to know, over large landscapes, where wildfires are likely to occur and how intense they may be. To meet this need we developed a map that we call wildfire hazard potential (WHP) – a raster geospatial product that can help to inform evaluations of wildfire risk or prioritization of fuels management needs across very large spatial scales (millions of acres).

Wildfire Hazard Potential (WHP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2014 continuous

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
Federal wildfire managers often want to know, over large landscapes, where wildfires are likely to occur and how intense they may be. To meet this need we developed a map that we call wildfire hazard potential (WHP) – a raster geospatial product that can help to inform evaluations of wildfire risk or prioritization of fuels management needs across very large spatial scales (millions of acres).

Wildland Fire Potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2012 continuous

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
The wildland fire potential (WFP) map is a raster geospatial product produced by the USDA Forest Service, Fire Modeling Institute that is intended to be used in analyses of wildfire risk or hazardous fuels prioritization at large landscapes (100s of square miles) up through regional or national scales.

Wildland Fire Potential (WFP) for the conterminous United States (270-m GRID), version 2012 classified

Datasets Posted on: November 24, 2015
The wildland fire potential (WFP) map is a raster geospatial product produced by the USDA Forest Service, Fire Modeling Institute that is intended to be used in analyses of wildfire risk or hazardous fuels prioritization at large landscapes (100s of square miles) up through regional or national scales.

LANDFIRE - A national vegetation/fuels data base for use in fuels treatment, restoration, and suppression planning

Publications Posted on: July 30, 2013
LANDFIRE is the working name given to the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (http://www.landfire.gov).

Implications of fire management on cultural resources [Chapter 9]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Previous chapters in this synthesis have identified the important fuel, weather, and fire relationships associated with damage to cultural resources (CR). They have also identified the types of effects commonly encountered in various fire situations and provided some guidance on how to recognize damages and minimize their occurrence.

Effects of fire on intangible cultural resources: Moving toward a landscape approach [Chapter 8]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Long before the Secretaries of the Departments of Agriculture and Interior signed the Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy in 1995, most land and resource professionals in the United States had recognized unprecedented fuel accumulations in western forests as management priorities.

The effects of fire on subsurface archaeological materials [Chapter 7]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
In this chapter, we concentrate on the effects of fire on subsurface archaeological deposits: the matrix containing post-depositional fill, artifacts, ecofactual data, dating samples, and other cultural and noncultural materials. In order to provide a context for understanding these data, this paper provides a summary of previous research about the potential effects of fire on subsurface cultural materials.

Fire effects on materials of the historic period [Chapter 6]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
In a literal sense "historical artifacts" and "historical sites" are all artifacts and sites dating after the introduction of written history in any region. For example, in New Mexico, these would be sites dating after AD 1540, the year of the first Spanish entrada into what would later become the State of New Mexico.

Fire effects on rock images and similar cultural resources [Chapter 5]

Publications Posted on: April 03, 2012
Throughout human global history, people have purposely altered natural rock surfaces by drilling, drawing, painting, incising, pecking, abrading and chiseling images into stone. Some rock types that present suitable media surfaces for these activities are fine-grained sandstones and granites, basalts, volcanic tuff, dolomites, and limestones.

Pages