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Keyword: fire ecology

Effects of bark beetle attack on canopy fuel flammability and crown fire potential in lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce forests

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Large wildland fires in conifer forests typically involve some degree of crowning, with their initiation and propagation dependent upon several characteristics of the canopy fuels. Recent outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var.

Spatially explicit quantification of heterogeneous fire effects over long time series: Patterns from two forest types in the northern U.S. Rockies

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Within the last decade, mixed-severity fire regimes (MSFRs) have gained increasing attention in both the scientific and management communities (Arno and others 2000, Baker and others 2007, Hessburg and others 2007, Perry and others 2011, Halofsky and others 2011, Stine and others 2014).

Strategic operations planning - it's not just for wilderness! How the Strategic Operations Planner can help

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
The Strategic Operational Planner (SOPL) wildland fire management position was created in the United States in 2009 to reflect updated terminology. SOPL merges the former Fire Use Manager positions (FUM1 and FUM2) and is now an established position within the Incident Command System. Traditionally, the FUM positions and the SOPL have been used on incidents managed for resource benefit, wildland fire use, and on long-duration events.

Measuring the wildland firefighting safety culture change - an analysis of entrapment rates from 1994 to 2013

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
The tragic fatality events of the mid-1990s and subsequent studies led to a concentrated effort to increase safety in the US federal wildland firefighter community beginning in 2000. Addressing human factors (HF) as a causal agent in accidents was a major focal point for this cultural change. To examine the effectiveness of this change, we hypothesized a decline in firefighter entrapment rates after implementation.

Creation and implementation of a certification system for insurability and fire risk classification for forest plantations

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Currently, the Chilean insurance market sells forest fire insurance policies and agricultural weather risk policies. However, access to forest fire insurance is difficult for small and medium enterprises (SMEs), with a significant proportion (close to 50%) of forest plantations being without coverage.

Assessing three fuel classification systems and their maps using Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) surface fuel measurements

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Fuel classifications are integral tools in fire management and planning because they are used as inputs to fire behavior and effects simulation models. Fuel Loading Models (FLMs) and Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCSs) fuelbeds are the most popular classifications used throughout wildland fire science and management, but they have yet to be thoroughly evaluated with field data.

Ecological fire use for ecological fire management: Managing large wildfires by design

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Past fire exclusion policies and fire suppression actions have led to a historic "fire deficit" on public wildlands. These sociocultural actions have led to unprecedented environmental changes that have created conditions conducive to more frequent large-scale wildfires.

Mapping landscape fire frequency for fire regime condition class

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC) is a departure index that compares the current amounts of the different vegetation succession classes, fire frequency, and fire severity to historic reference conditions. FRCC assessments have been widely used for evaluating ecosystem status in many areas of the U.S. in reports such as land use plans, fire management plans, project plans, burn plans, and agency reporting.

Influence of landscape gradients in wilderness management and spatial climate on fire severity in the Northern Rockies USA, 1984 to 2010

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Management activities, applied over broad scales, can potentially affect attributes of fire regimes including fire severity. Wilderness landscapes provide a natural laboratory for exploring effects of management because in some federally designated wilderness areas the burning of naturally ignited fires is promoted.

Building Fire Behavior Analyst (FBAN) capability and capacity: Lessons learned From Victoria, Australia's Bushfire Behavior Predictive Services Strategy

Publications Posted on: September 29, 2015
Wildland fire managers must frequently make meaning from chaos in order to protect communities and infrastructure from the negative impacts of fire. Fire management personnel are increasingly turning to science to support their experience-based decision-making processes and to provide clear, confident leadership for communities frequently exposed to risk from wildfire.

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