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Keyword: fire

Proceedings-research and management of bitterbrush and cliffrose in Western North America

Publications Posted on: February 26, 2019
Bitterbrush and cliff rose are perhaps the most widely managed shrubs in Western North America. This proceedings of 27 papers is a collection of our current knowledge on research and management of bitterbrush, cliffrose, and other rosaceous shrubs in Western North America.

Postharvest residue burning under alternative silvicultural practices

Documents and Media Posted on: December 20, 2018
Prescribed burning of logging slash was done in clearcut, overstory removal, and understory cutting units in a Douglas-fir stand on the Lubrecht Experimental Forest near Missoula, Mont. The burning prescriptions and actual burning conditions are described. Data on preharvest, postharvest, and postburn conditions are reported.  Document Type: Other Documents

Social dynamics of wildland fire in California [Chapter 27]

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2018
A useful question for managers to ask is: why do we care about understanding fire’s ecological processes? At a theoretical level, knowledge itself may be the goal. However, at a more practical level, funding and research interest tends to reflect a desire to understand how to manipulate ecological processes to favor one or several preferred management outcomes.

A reconceptualization of open oak and pine ecosystems of eastern North America using a forest structure spectrum

Publications Posted on: November 15, 2018
We present a reconceptualization of forests in eastern North America by differentiating the ecological characteristics of open oak (Quercus) and pine (Pinus) forests from closed successional and oldgrowth forests. Despite historical abundance of savannas and woodlands, the fundamental ecology of open forest ecosystems remains ill-defined when compared to either closed forests or grasslands.

Fire effects on herbaceous regeneration across an invasion gradient in grasslands and shrublands

Projects Posted on: November 02, 2018
Post-fire resiliency of plant communities in northern mixed-grass prairie and eastern sagebrush steppe depends largely on plant regeneration from aboveground and belowground buds. Canopy and stem regeneration occurs more quickly via the bud bank than via seedling recruitment. To better predict plant community responses to fire, we need an enhanced understanding of the immediate and long-term bud responses of key forb, grass, and shrub species to fire.  

Daily black carbon emissions from fires in northern Eurasia for 2002-2015

Publications Posted on: October 05, 2018
Black carbon (BC) emitted from fires in northern Eurasia is transported and deposited on ice and snow in the Arctic and can accelerate its melting during certain times of the year. Thus, we developed a high spatial resolution (500m x 500 m) dataset to examine daily BC emissions from fires in this region for 2002-2015.

Is increased precipitation during the 20th century statistically or ecologically significant in the eastern US?

Publications Posted on: September 26, 2018
We address the climate versus disturbance debate to understand drivers of change in human-environment systems. We examine whether recent increased precipitation episodes (‘pluvials’) are unique and have ecological implications for the humid climate of the eastern United States. Robust statistical analyzes presented here indicate that the 20th century was wet, but not significantly different than other centuries during the last millennium.

The legacy of severe wildfire on stream water quality

FS News Posted on: September 25, 2018
Do severe wildfires impact rivers and reservoirs years after they burn? In Colorado, at the site of the 2002 Hayman Fire, a new study found that watersheds with extensive high-severity wildfire still contained elevated levels of streamwater nitrogen. While elevated nitrogen and carbon in burned watersheds are not a threat to drinking water quality, they do exceed expected levels for healthy streams in this area. 

An update of the National Fire Danger Rating System

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 13, 2018
The National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) is a system that allows fire managers to estimate today's or tomorrow's fire danger for a given area. In 2014, RMRS fire danger rating system developers sought and gained approval to update the U.S. National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS).

Environmental, structural, and disturbance influences over forest floor components in interior Douglas-fir forests of the Intermountain West, USA

Publications Posted on: August 21, 2018
Downed woody material (DWM) is a key component in forest ecosystems with age, structure, and disturbance described as primary factors that influence DWM dynamics. In particular, much emphasis is placed on large coarse woody debris (CWD).

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