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Keyword: fire

Recognizing and restoring open forests of savannas and woodlands

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 25, 2019
Although not presented in textbooks, open forests were the dominant historical forested ecosystems of the United States. Eastern and western oak forests and southeastern pine forests no longer occur at landscape scales. Management for open oak and pine forests will provide herbaceous habitat, critical to many declining bird and pollinator species.

Climate change vulnerability assessments for the Front Range and Colorado National Grasslands

Projects Posted on: April 24, 2019
Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment in Support of Front Range National Forests and Colorado National Grasslands for Forest Plan Revision, Plan Amendments, and Project-Level Planning.

Rio Grande National Forest: Fire Bibliography

Documents and Media Posted on: April 23, 2019
One of the bibliographies included in the supplemental materials for the 2016 Rio Grande National Forest Climate Change Plan Revision workshop.  Document Type: Other Documents

Trajectory from beech and oak forests to eastern broadleaf forests in Indiana, USA

Publications Posted on: April 05, 2019
Background: Historical forests (circa 1799 to 1846) of Indiana were predominantly composed of American beech (25% of all trees) and upland oaks (27% of all trees). I compared historical forest composition, using studies of smaller areas to approximate composition for uncommon species or genera (

Open forest management for early successional birds

Publications Posted on: March 27, 2019
Wildlife biologists classify some bird species as early successional because of apparent dependence on early successional vegetation such as forbs, grasses, shrubs, and small trees.

Proceedings-research and management of bitterbrush and cliffrose in Western North America

Publications Posted on: February 26, 2019
Bitterbrush and cliff rose are perhaps the most widely managed shrubs in Western North America. This proceedings of 27 papers is a collection of our current knowledge on research and management of bitterbrush, cliffrose, and other rosaceous shrubs in Western North America.

Postharvest residue burning under alternative silvicultural practices

Documents and Media Posted on: December 20, 2018
Prescribed burning of logging slash was done in clearcut, overstory removal, and understory cutting units in a Douglas-fir stand on the Lubrecht Experimental Forest near Missoula, Mont. The burning prescriptions and actual burning conditions are described. Data on preharvest, postharvest, and postburn conditions are reported.  Document Type: Other Documents

Social dynamics of wildland fire in California [Chapter 27]

Publications Posted on: December 14, 2018
A useful question for managers to ask is: why do we care about understanding fire’s ecological processes? At a theoretical level, knowledge itself may be the goal. However, at a more practical level, funding and research interest tends to reflect a desire to understand how to manipulate ecological processes to favor one or several preferred management outcomes.

A reconceptualization of open oak and pine ecosystems of eastern North America using a forest structure spectrum

Publications Posted on: November 15, 2018
We present a reconceptualization of forests in eastern North America by differentiating the ecological characteristics of open oak (Quercus) and pine (Pinus) forests from closed successional and oldgrowth forests. Despite historical abundance of savannas and woodlands, the fundamental ecology of open forest ecosystems remains ill-defined when compared to either closed forests or grasslands.

Fire effects on herbaceous regeneration across an invasion gradient in grasslands and shrublands

Projects Posted on: November 02, 2018
Post-fire resiliency of plant communities in northern mixed-grass prairie and eastern sagebrush steppe depends largely on plant regeneration from aboveground and belowground buds. Canopy and stem regeneration occurs more quickly via the bud bank than via seedling recruitment. To better predict plant community responses to fire, we need an enhanced understanding of the immediate and long-term bud responses of key forb, grass, and shrub species to fire.  

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